Identification of a human glial fibrillary acidic protein cDNA: A tool for the molecular analysis of reactive gliosis in the mammalian central nervous system

Identification of a human glial fibrillary acidic protein cDNA: A tool for the molecular analysis... Two clones encoding human glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) were isolated from a human astrocytoma cDNA library. The clones pHGFAP1 and pHGFAP2 were selected by the combined use of differential colony hybridization and hybridization‐selection technique with polyclonal anti GFAP antiserum. The longer one, pHGFAP1, encompasses 3.0 kb and includes the 1.8 kb long 3′ untranslated region specific to the human mRNA. Sequence data disclosed an extensive homology within the coding region of human and mouse GFAP cDNAs even in the end domains. Blot hybridization analysis of RNAs from human, rat and mouse brain revealed a single GFAP mRNA species of 3.1, 2.8 and 2.7 kb respectively and Southern blot experiments indicated that this mRNA is most probably transcribed from a unique gene. In situ hybridization performed with biotinylated probes on cultured mouse brain cells suggests both the sorting and the transport of GFAP mRNA throughout the cytoplasm and processes of the astrocytes. As a model of reactive gliosis secondary to degenerative disorders, 6‐hydroxydopamine (6‐OHDA) lesion of the substantia nigra in the rat was performed. GFAP mRNA increased 1.4 fold in the ipsilateral striatum on day 10 after the lesion. It then declined to the control level 4 months later contrasting with the lower and more sustained increase in preproenkephalin (PPE) mRNA. The interspecies cross‐reactivity of the HGFAP probes make them useful as a tool for the molecular analysis of reactive gliosis in various experimental models. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Neuroscience Research Wiley

Identification of a human glial fibrillary acidic protein cDNA: A tool for the molecular analysis of reactive gliosis in the mammalian central nervous system

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/identification-of-a-human-glial-fibrillary-acidic-protein-cdna-a-tool-1ne138IyTN
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1988 Alan R. Liss, Inc.
ISSN
0360-4012
eISSN
1097-4547
D.O.I.
10.1002/jnr.490200204
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Two clones encoding human glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) were isolated from a human astrocytoma cDNA library. The clones pHGFAP1 and pHGFAP2 were selected by the combined use of differential colony hybridization and hybridization‐selection technique with polyclonal anti GFAP antiserum. The longer one, pHGFAP1, encompasses 3.0 kb and includes the 1.8 kb long 3′ untranslated region specific to the human mRNA. Sequence data disclosed an extensive homology within the coding region of human and mouse GFAP cDNAs even in the end domains. Blot hybridization analysis of RNAs from human, rat and mouse brain revealed a single GFAP mRNA species of 3.1, 2.8 and 2.7 kb respectively and Southern blot experiments indicated that this mRNA is most probably transcribed from a unique gene. In situ hybridization performed with biotinylated probes on cultured mouse brain cells suggests both the sorting and the transport of GFAP mRNA throughout the cytoplasm and processes of the astrocytes. As a model of reactive gliosis secondary to degenerative disorders, 6‐hydroxydopamine (6‐OHDA) lesion of the substantia nigra in the rat was performed. GFAP mRNA increased 1.4 fold in the ipsilateral striatum on day 10 after the lesion. It then declined to the control level 4 months later contrasting with the lower and more sustained increase in preproenkephalin (PPE) mRNA. The interspecies cross‐reactivity of the HGFAP probes make them useful as a tool for the molecular analysis of reactive gliosis in various experimental models.

Journal

Journal of Neuroscience ResearchWiley

Published: Jun 1, 1988

References

  • Study of glial fibrillary acidic protein in a human glioma cell line grown in culture and as a solid tumor
    Bigbee, Bigbee; Bigner, Bigner; Pegram, Pegram; Eng, Eng
  • Astrocyte culture on nitrocellulose membranes and plastic: Detection of cytoskeletal proteins and mRNAs by immunocytochemistry and in situ hybridization
    Eng, Eng; Stöcklin, Stöcklin; Lee, Lee; Shiurba, Shiurba; Coria, Coria; Halks‐Miller, Halks‐Miller; Mozsgai, Mozsgai; Fukayama, Fukayama; Gibbs, Gibbs
  • Isolation and characterization of glial filaments from human brain
    Goldman, Goldman; Schaumburg, Schaumburg; Norton, Norton
  • The immunological identification of brain proteins on cellulose nitrate in human demyelinating disease
    Newcombe, Newcombe; Glynn, Glynn; Cuzner, Cuzner
  • An efficient approach for the selective isolation of specific transcripts from complex brain mRNA populations
    Rhyner, Rhyner; Faucon Biguet, Faucon Biguet; Berrard, Berrard; Borbely, Borbely; Mallet, Mallet
  • The molecular biology of intermediate filaments
    Steinert, Steinert; Steven, Steven; Roop, Roop

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off