Human Resources Practices as Predictors of Work‐Family Outcomes and Employee Turnover

Human Resources Practices as Predictors of Work‐Family Outcomes and Employee Turnover Drawing on a nonrandom sample of 557 dual‐earner white‐collar employees, this article explores the relationship between human resources practices and three outcomes of interest to firms and employees: work‐family conflict, employees’ control over managing work and family demands, and employees’ turnover intentions. We analyze three types of human resources practices: work‐family policies, human resources incentives designed to induce attachment to the firm, and the design of work. In a series of hierarchical regression equations, we find that work design characteristics explain the most variance in employees’ control over managing work and family demands, whereas human resources incentives explain the most variance in work‐family conflict and turnover intentions. We also find significant gender differences in each of the three models. Our results suggest that the most effective organizational responses to work‐family conflict and to turnover are those that combine work‐family policies with other human resources practices, including work redesign and commitment‐enhancing incentives. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Industrial Relations Wiley

Human Resources Practices as Predictors of Work‐Family Outcomes and Employee Turnover

Industrial Relations, Volume 42 (2) – Apr 1, 2003

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0019-8676
eISSN
1468-232X
DOI
10.1111/1468-232X.00287
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Drawing on a nonrandom sample of 557 dual‐earner white‐collar employees, this article explores the relationship between human resources practices and three outcomes of interest to firms and employees: work‐family conflict, employees’ control over managing work and family demands, and employees’ turnover intentions. We analyze three types of human resources practices: work‐family policies, human resources incentives designed to induce attachment to the firm, and the design of work. In a series of hierarchical regression equations, we find that work design characteristics explain the most variance in employees’ control over managing work and family demands, whereas human resources incentives explain the most variance in work‐family conflict and turnover intentions. We also find significant gender differences in each of the three models. Our results suggest that the most effective organizational responses to work‐family conflict and to turnover are those that combine work‐family policies with other human resources practices, including work redesign and commitment‐enhancing incentives.

Journal

Industrial RelationsWiley

Published: Apr 1, 2003

References

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