Human resource management ‐ the workers' verdict

Human resource management ‐ the workers' verdict rom its inception human resource management re¯ ected a management agenda to the neglect of workers’ concerns. In their appeal to a management audience, the more extravagant claims of its advocates held out the promise of HRM as a route to excellence and high performance. Indeed, an increasingly dominant stream of research within the broad ® eld of HRM explores the relationship between HRM and performance, often incorporating aspects of business and HR strategy (Arthur, 1994; Becker and Gerhard, 1996; Guest, 1997; Huselid, 1995). In marked contrast, another stream of writing has provided a powerful critique of both the promise and the practice ± or the rhetoric and the reality (Legge, 1995) ± of HRM. Adopting a critical and occasionally post-modern perspective, this approach has sought to undermine both the theoretical analysis of HRM and its application. Interestingly, the target is less the hard-nosed business case for HRM than the claims that HRM offers a new model of the management of people at work built around attempts to increase their commitment. While this critical analysis implicitly reflects a sympathy for the workers’ viewpoint, it is rarely able to draw on evidence about workers’ reactions to HRM. This dearth http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Human Resource Management Journal Wiley

Human resource management ‐ the workers' verdict

Human Resource Management Journal, Volume 9 (3) – Jul 1, 1999

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1999 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0954-5395
eISSN
1748-8583
DOI
10.1111/j.1748-8583.1999.tb00200.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

rom its inception human resource management re¯ ected a management agenda to the neglect of workers’ concerns. In their appeal to a management audience, the more extravagant claims of its advocates held out the promise of HRM as a route to excellence and high performance. Indeed, an increasingly dominant stream of research within the broad ® eld of HRM explores the relationship between HRM and performance, often incorporating aspects of business and HR strategy (Arthur, 1994; Becker and Gerhard, 1996; Guest, 1997; Huselid, 1995). In marked contrast, another stream of writing has provided a powerful critique of both the promise and the practice ± or the rhetoric and the reality (Legge, 1995) ± of HRM. Adopting a critical and occasionally post-modern perspective, this approach has sought to undermine both the theoretical analysis of HRM and its application. Interestingly, the target is less the hard-nosed business case for HRM than the claims that HRM offers a new model of the management of people at work built around attempts to increase their commitment. While this critical analysis implicitly reflects a sympathy for the workers’ viewpoint, it is rarely able to draw on evidence about workers’ reactions to HRM. This dearth

Journal

Human Resource Management JournalWiley

Published: Jul 1, 1999

References

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