Human parvovirus B19 specific IgG, IgA, and IgM antibodies and DNA in serum specimens from persons with erythema infectiosum

Human parvovirus B19 specific IgG, IgA, and IgM antibodies and DNA in serum specimens from... To determine the diagnostic use of different markers of acute parvovirus 619 infection, serum specimens obtained from 128 persons with erythema infectiosum were tested for specific immunoglobulin G (IgG), IgA, and IgM antibodies by capture enzyme immunoassay (EIA) using Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell‐expressed B19 antigen, and tested for circulating B19 DNA by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). A significant rise in specific IgG and IgA antibodies was detected in 87% and 77%, respectively, of persons from whom acute‐ and convalescent‐phase serum specimens were available. Specific IgA antibodies were detected in single serum specimens from 90% of cases and were present in 22 (18%) of 120 persons from a control group without a history of recent exposure to B19. Specific IgM antibodies were detected i n 97% of cases and one person (IYO) from the control group. B19 DNA was detected in 94% of cases and was absent in 20 persons from the control group positive for both IgG and IgA antibodies. Serum specimens obtained between 4 and 6 months after onset of illness from six additional persons were also tested. All had specific IgG antibodies, four (67%) had IgA, five (83%) had IgM, and none had detectable B19 DNA. Our data indicate that 1) specific IgA antibodies are too persistent to be a useful indicator of recent B19 infection; 2) specific IgM antibodies are the most sensitive indicator of acute B19 infection in immunologically normal persons but can persist up to 6 months; and 3) 619 DNA can often be detected up to 2 months after onset of illness even in immunologically normal hosts and might be a useful adjunct test for diagnosis of acute B19 infection. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Medical Virology Wiley

Human parvovirus B19 specific IgG, IgA, and IgM antibodies and DNA in serum specimens from persons with erythema infectiosum

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1991 Wiley‐Liss, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0146-6615
eISSN
1096-9071
DOI
10.1002/jmv.1890350207
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

To determine the diagnostic use of different markers of acute parvovirus 619 infection, serum specimens obtained from 128 persons with erythema infectiosum were tested for specific immunoglobulin G (IgG), IgA, and IgM antibodies by capture enzyme immunoassay (EIA) using Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell‐expressed B19 antigen, and tested for circulating B19 DNA by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). A significant rise in specific IgG and IgA antibodies was detected in 87% and 77%, respectively, of persons from whom acute‐ and convalescent‐phase serum specimens were available. Specific IgA antibodies were detected in single serum specimens from 90% of cases and were present in 22 (18%) of 120 persons from a control group without a history of recent exposure to B19. Specific IgM antibodies were detected i n 97% of cases and one person (IYO) from the control group. B19 DNA was detected in 94% of cases and was absent in 20 persons from the control group positive for both IgG and IgA antibodies. Serum specimens obtained between 4 and 6 months after onset of illness from six additional persons were also tested. All had specific IgG antibodies, four (67%) had IgA, five (83%) had IgM, and none had detectable B19 DNA. Our data indicate that 1) specific IgA antibodies are too persistent to be a useful indicator of recent B19 infection; 2) specific IgM antibodies are the most sensitive indicator of acute B19 infection in immunologically normal persons but can persist up to 6 months; and 3) 619 DNA can often be detected up to 2 months after onset of illness even in immunologically normal hosts and might be a useful adjunct test for diagnosis of acute B19 infection.

Journal

Journal of Medical VirologyWiley

Published: Oct 1, 1991

References

  • Diagnosis of human parvovirus infection by dot‐blot hybridization using cloned viral DNA
    Anderson, Anderson; Jones, Jones; Minson, Minson
  • Intrauterine infection with human parvovirus B19: a light and electron microscopy study
    Caul, Caul; Usher, Usher; Burton, Burton

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