Human Lymphocyte Subpopulations: Classification According to Surface Markers and/or Functional Characteristics

Human Lymphocyte Subpopulations: Classification According to Surface Markers and/or Functional... JONDAL*, HANS WIGZELL** FERNANDO A I U T I * * * INTRODUCTION Lymphocytes of birds and mammals can be subdivided into two major groups according to origin and function. If classified according to dependence or origin they are called thymus-dependent or T lymphocytes and bursa-derived or B lymphocytes (Raff 1973). Whereas in animal model systems the functional role of these cells have been assessed under varying experimental conditions, analogies have been provided for by the experiment of nature in human beings suffering from immunodeficiency disorders (Gatti 1972, Cooper e al. 1973). Such comparisons have made it possible to state quite emphatically that the human T and B lymphocyte populations exist with similar functional characteristics as in the other mammals. Whereas especially in the mouse, progress into the functional characteristics of the subpopulations of lymphocytes have been made largely on the basis of development of surface markers allowing actual physical separation of the various groups of cells, less is known about such ptossibilities in the human system. It is the purpose of the present article to present some of the surface markers we have used in our analysis of human lymphocytes under varying clinical and experimental conditions. The http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Immunological Reviews Wiley

Human Lymphocyte Subpopulations: Classification According to Surface Markers and/or Functional Characteristics

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1973 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0105-2896
eISSN
1600-065X
DOI
10.1111/j.1600-065X.1973.tb00120.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

JONDAL*, HANS WIGZELL** FERNANDO A I U T I * * * INTRODUCTION Lymphocytes of birds and mammals can be subdivided into two major groups according to origin and function. If classified according to dependence or origin they are called thymus-dependent or T lymphocytes and bursa-derived or B lymphocytes (Raff 1973). Whereas in animal model systems the functional role of these cells have been assessed under varying experimental conditions, analogies have been provided for by the experiment of nature in human beings suffering from immunodeficiency disorders (Gatti 1972, Cooper e al. 1973). Such comparisons have made it possible to state quite emphatically that the human T and B lymphocyte populations exist with similar functional characteristics as in the other mammals. Whereas especially in the mouse, progress into the functional characteristics of the subpopulations of lymphocytes have been made largely on the basis of development of surface markers allowing actual physical separation of the various groups of cells, less is known about such ptossibilities in the human system. It is the purpose of the present article to present some of the surface markers we have used in our analysis of human lymphocytes under varying clinical and experimental conditions. The

Journal

Immunological ReviewsWiley

Published: Sep 1, 1973

References

  • Surface immunoglobulin on thymus and thymus‐derived lymphoid cells
    Bankhurst, Bankhurst; Warner, Warner; Sprent, Sprent
  • Sheep red cell binding to human lymphocytes treated with neuraminidase of T cell and identification of a subpopulation of B cells
    Bentwich, Bentwich; Douglas, Douglas; Skutdsky, Skutdsky; Kunkel, Kunkel
  • A population of lymphocytes bearing a membrane receptor for antigen‐antibody complement complexes
    Bianco, Bianco; Patrick, Patrick; Nussenzweig, Nussenzweig
  • Rosette formation by human B and T lymphocytes
    Brain, Brain; Marston, Marston
  • Bone marrow origin of complement‐receptor lymphocytes
    Dukor, Dukor; Bianco, Bianco; Nussenzweig, Nussenzweig

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