How Young Refugees Cope with Conflict in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Urban Schools

How Young Refugees Cope with Conflict in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Urban Schools What is already known on this topicYoung people who experience multiple risk factors such as exposure to war and trauma, forced migration, resettlement stresses, and problems at school are more likely to use non‐productive coping strategies in response to stressors and develop mental health problems.The majority of young refugees cope well with resettlement as demonstrated by the relatively low prevalence of mental health problems found for this population.Practitioners need to consider culturally appropriate and valid ways of assessing the presence of risk and protective factors for young refugees in order to optimise prevention and intervention strategies within diverse school contexts.What this paper addsQuantitative and qualitative assessments of students’ coping in relation to interpersonal conflicts revealed that avoidance, usually considered as a “less” productive strategy may be a more adaptive response to conflict in a school context perceived as unsafe.Students appeared more likely to prefer non‐productive coping when faced with conflict if they are a girl, older in age, have experienced trauma, transitioned from language to mainstream school, and have been in Australia longer than a year.Universal conflict resolution education programs conceptualise conflict within a problem‐solving and coping framework that would be beneficial to those students exposed to trauma and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Australian Psychologist Wiley

How Young Refugees Cope with Conflict in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Urban Schools

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Publisher
Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
Copyright
© 2018 The Australian Psychological Society
ISSN
0005-0067
eISSN
1742-9544
D.O.I.
10.1111/ap.12245
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

What is already known on this topicYoung people who experience multiple risk factors such as exposure to war and trauma, forced migration, resettlement stresses, and problems at school are more likely to use non‐productive coping strategies in response to stressors and develop mental health problems.The majority of young refugees cope well with resettlement as demonstrated by the relatively low prevalence of mental health problems found for this population.Practitioners need to consider culturally appropriate and valid ways of assessing the presence of risk and protective factors for young refugees in order to optimise prevention and intervention strategies within diverse school contexts.What this paper addsQuantitative and qualitative assessments of students’ coping in relation to interpersonal conflicts revealed that avoidance, usually considered as a “less” productive strategy may be a more adaptive response to conflict in a school context perceived as unsafe.Students appeared more likely to prefer non‐productive coping when faced with conflict if they are a girl, older in age, have experienced trauma, transitioned from language to mainstream school, and have been in Australia longer than a year.Universal conflict resolution education programs conceptualise conflict within a problem‐solving and coping framework that would be beneficial to those students exposed to trauma and

Journal

Australian PsychologistWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

Keywords: ; ; ; ; ;

References

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