How wild is the ocean? Assessing the intensity of anthropogenic marine activities in British Columbia, Canada

How wild is the ocean? Assessing the intensity of anthropogenic marine activities in British... 1. The intensity of marine activities in the exclusive economic zone (EEZ) of British Columbia, Canada, was quantified. 2. Humans use the ocean for a multitude of purposes, many of which have a direct impact on marine life and habitat. Yet such uses are seldom assessed in an integrated fashion. 3. Using a GIS approach, spatial information for 39 marine activities was mapped, including commercial and recreational fishing areas, transportation and infrastructure uses, and terrestrial activities along the coast of British Columbia. 4. A relative scale was used to rank both the impact of marine activities and the extent of stressors beyond the location of occurrence. Limited information on the latter led to the application of three ranges of buffer distances to the data (0–1 km, 0–5 km, and 0–25 km). 5. The most conservative estimate (⩽1 km buffers) indicates at least 83% of the continental shelf and slope of British Columbia is currently being used by humans. The largest buffer assumption shows 98% of the continental shelf and slope being affected by stressors from anthropogenic activities. 6. This analysis provides a baseline for assessing future changes in the state of British Columbia's marine environment, and could assist in identifying areas of conservation potential. Copyright © 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aquatic Conservation: Marine and Freshwater Ecosystems Wiley

How wild is the ocean? Assessing the intensity of anthropogenic marine activities in British Columbia, Canada

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
ISSN
1052-7613
eISSN
1099-0755
DOI
10.1002/aqc.816
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

1. The intensity of marine activities in the exclusive economic zone (EEZ) of British Columbia, Canada, was quantified. 2. Humans use the ocean for a multitude of purposes, many of which have a direct impact on marine life and habitat. Yet such uses are seldom assessed in an integrated fashion. 3. Using a GIS approach, spatial information for 39 marine activities was mapped, including commercial and recreational fishing areas, transportation and infrastructure uses, and terrestrial activities along the coast of British Columbia. 4. A relative scale was used to rank both the impact of marine activities and the extent of stressors beyond the location of occurrence. Limited information on the latter led to the application of three ranges of buffer distances to the data (0–1 km, 0–5 km, and 0–25 km). 5. The most conservative estimate (⩽1 km buffers) indicates at least 83% of the continental shelf and slope of British Columbia is currently being used by humans. The largest buffer assumption shows 98% of the continental shelf and slope being affected by stressors from anthropogenic activities. 6. This analysis provides a baseline for assessing future changes in the state of British Columbia's marine environment, and could assist in identifying areas of conservation potential. Copyright © 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Journal

Aquatic Conservation: Marine and Freshwater EcosystemsWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2008

References

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