How we do it: anterior and posterior nosebleed trainer, the 3D printing epistaxis project

How we do it: anterior and posterior nosebleed trainer, the 3D printing epistaxis project IntroductionThomas stated that simply watching an expert do a procedure will not increase a student's ability to perform that procedure. In this way, training should consist of more than a slow demonstration of a procedure at the bedside by an instructor.Epistaxis is a common and potentially life‐threatening condition. In the emergency room, doctors admit around 81% of nasally packed patients under ENT, but only 17% have received training about managing epistaxis. Moreover, the subsequent consequences that nasal pack replacement causes, including further pain and discomfort and the lack of training, have implications for patient safety.Junior emergency doctor and junior ENT doctors are exposed to nosebleeding at the beginning of their training, dealing with different kinds of cases from simple to more complex. Therefore, simulation can be a useful method of reinforcing learning about nasal packing.Three‐dimensional printing is a layered manufacturing method that can be used to fabricate complex structures. Using 3D printing, a physical object can be fabricated from a 3D computer‐aided design model layer by layer, more conveniently and more rapidly than other manufacturing means. Additionally, it is easy to customise a product according to personal requirement.Materials and methodsTo construct our nosebleed simulator, we retrospectively reviewed different CT http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Clinical Otolaryngology Wiley

How we do it: anterior and posterior nosebleed trainer, the 3D printing epistaxis project

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd
ISSN
1749-4478
eISSN
1749-4486
D.O.I.
10.1111/coa.12711
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

IntroductionThomas stated that simply watching an expert do a procedure will not increase a student's ability to perform that procedure. In this way, training should consist of more than a slow demonstration of a procedure at the bedside by an instructor.Epistaxis is a common and potentially life‐threatening condition. In the emergency room, doctors admit around 81% of nasally packed patients under ENT, but only 17% have received training about managing epistaxis. Moreover, the subsequent consequences that nasal pack replacement causes, including further pain and discomfort and the lack of training, have implications for patient safety.Junior emergency doctor and junior ENT doctors are exposed to nosebleeding at the beginning of their training, dealing with different kinds of cases from simple to more complex. Therefore, simulation can be a useful method of reinforcing learning about nasal packing.Three‐dimensional printing is a layered manufacturing method that can be used to fabricate complex structures. Using 3D printing, a physical object can be fabricated from a 3D computer‐aided design model layer by layer, more conveniently and more rapidly than other manufacturing means. Additionally, it is easy to customise a product according to personal requirement.Materials and methodsTo construct our nosebleed simulator, we retrospectively reviewed different CT

Journal

Clinical OtolaryngologyWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

References

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