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How to keep productivity and employees humming during a facilities move

How to keep productivity and employees humming during a facilities move here are a variety of reasons why companies decide to move to new facilities, including the desire to secure more appropriate space for their employees and operations, to capitalize on more favorable business and employment environments, or simply to improve the lifestyle of their employees. According to a recent International Facilities Management Association (IFMA) survey, companies move, remodel, or relocate 25 to 30 percent of their facilities’ total square footage each year. These moves run the gamut, from local relocations within the same building or city to across-the-country moves to international relocations. Whatever the motivation for the move, senior management of any company expects a company relocation to be a positive experience—one that will result in improved operations, more cost-effective facilities, raised productivity, and increased profits. A lot is at stake if the move does not go smoothly. Take, for example, the overall costs associated with a move, costs that will need to be recouped out of the benefits attained by the move. As one moving consultant recently put it: “Just moving within the same building can cost from $400 to over $1,000 per person.” More important than the cost of the move itself, a relocation can seriously http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Employment Relations Today Wiley

How to keep productivity and employees humming during a facilities move

Employment Relations Today , Volume 33 (4) – Dec 1, 2007

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
ISSN
0745-7790
eISSN
1520-6459
DOI
10.1002/ert.20126
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

here are a variety of reasons why companies decide to move to new facilities, including the desire to secure more appropriate space for their employees and operations, to capitalize on more favorable business and employment environments, or simply to improve the lifestyle of their employees. According to a recent International Facilities Management Association (IFMA) survey, companies move, remodel, or relocate 25 to 30 percent of their facilities’ total square footage each year. These moves run the gamut, from local relocations within the same building or city to across-the-country moves to international relocations. Whatever the motivation for the move, senior management of any company expects a company relocation to be a positive experience—one that will result in improved operations, more cost-effective facilities, raised productivity, and increased profits. A lot is at stake if the move does not go smoothly. Take, for example, the overall costs associated with a move, costs that will need to be recouped out of the benefits attained by the move. As one moving consultant recently put it: “Just moving within the same building can cost from $400 to over $1,000 per person.” More important than the cost of the move itself, a relocation can seriously

Journal

Employment Relations TodayWiley

Published: Dec 1, 2007

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