How does ontogeny in a Eucalyptus species affect patterns of herbivory by Brushtail Possums?

How does ontogeny in a Eucalyptus species affect patterns of herbivory by Brushtail Possums? Summary 1 Comparisons of adult and juvenile plant stages are often confounded by other factors such as differences in height between plants. However, these factors can be teased apart using common garden experiments and appropriate sampling designs. 2 Using paired sampling of upper and lower canopies of Eucalyptus nitens trees, which were growing in a common environment trial and only one of which had undergone the transition to adult foliage, this study assessed the effects of ontogeny and canopy position on the feeding preferences of Common Brushtail Possums (Trichosurus vulpecula) in captive feeding trials under choice conditions. 3 Possums preferred juvenile foliage over adult foliage. In contrast, canopy position did not influence preferences. 4 Adult foliage contained significantly less sideroxylonals (a compound known to deter herbivory by Brushtail Possums), but was significantly tougher (with thicker cuticle, more fibre, more lignin and a higher percentage dry mass) than juvenile foliage, suggesting that leaf toughness was more significant than defensive chemistry in influencing intake by possums. Adult foliage did not differ significantly from juvenile foliage in nitrogen, total phenolics or essential oil concentration. 5 Greater resistance to herbivory of adult foliage compared with juvenile foliage by a significant browser of eucalypt tree foliage could contribute to selection for an earlier change from juvenile to adult foliage in areas that are heavily browsed by possums. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Functional Ecology Wiley

How does ontogeny in a Eucalyptus species affect patterns of herbivory by Brushtail Possums?

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/how-does-ontogeny-in-a-eucalyptus-species-affect-patterns-of-herbivory-1yHsNtOmBN
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0269-8463
eISSN
1365-2435
DOI
10.1111/j.1365-2435.2006.01193.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Summary 1 Comparisons of adult and juvenile plant stages are often confounded by other factors such as differences in height between plants. However, these factors can be teased apart using common garden experiments and appropriate sampling designs. 2 Using paired sampling of upper and lower canopies of Eucalyptus nitens trees, which were growing in a common environment trial and only one of which had undergone the transition to adult foliage, this study assessed the effects of ontogeny and canopy position on the feeding preferences of Common Brushtail Possums (Trichosurus vulpecula) in captive feeding trials under choice conditions. 3 Possums preferred juvenile foliage over adult foliage. In contrast, canopy position did not influence preferences. 4 Adult foliage contained significantly less sideroxylonals (a compound known to deter herbivory by Brushtail Possums), but was significantly tougher (with thicker cuticle, more fibre, more lignin and a higher percentage dry mass) than juvenile foliage, suggesting that leaf toughness was more significant than defensive chemistry in influencing intake by possums. Adult foliage did not differ significantly from juvenile foliage in nitrogen, total phenolics or essential oil concentration. 5 Greater resistance to herbivory of adult foliage compared with juvenile foliage by a significant browser of eucalypt tree foliage could contribute to selection for an earlier change from juvenile to adult foliage in areas that are heavily browsed by possums.

Journal

Functional EcologyWiley

Published: Dec 1, 2006

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off