How deep can we see the high velocity anomalies beneath the Japan Islands?

How deep can we see the high velocity anomalies beneath the Japan Islands? High velocity anomalies are found in the lower mantle beneath the Japan Islands and their vicinity through an analysis of detailed three‐dimensional P‐wave velocity structure based on a tomographic inversion of ISC data. Beneath the Sea of Japan, the high velocity anomalies in the lower mantle are slab‐like and appear to extend below the deep focus earthquakes of the high velocity Pacific slab descending from the Japan trench. This slab‐like high velocity body extending into the lower mantle steepens below a depth of 500‐600 km. Resolution analyses confirms the existence of a slab‐like high velocity region in the lower mantle, though the depth extent is not well resolved. On the other hand, the Pacific slab descending from the Izu‐Bonin trench seems to be fingering, that is, high velocity anomalies are penetrating into the lower mantle beneath latitude 26°N, and not penetrating but horizontally bending in the deeper portion of the upper mantle around 29°N. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Geophysical Research Letters Wiley

How deep can we see the high velocity anomalies beneath the Japan Islands?

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 1988 by the Chinese Geophysical Society
ISSN
0094-8276
eISSN
1944-8007
DOI
10.1029/GL015i008p00828
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

High velocity anomalies are found in the lower mantle beneath the Japan Islands and their vicinity through an analysis of detailed three‐dimensional P‐wave velocity structure based on a tomographic inversion of ISC data. Beneath the Sea of Japan, the high velocity anomalies in the lower mantle are slab‐like and appear to extend below the deep focus earthquakes of the high velocity Pacific slab descending from the Japan trench. This slab‐like high velocity body extending into the lower mantle steepens below a depth of 500‐600 km. Resolution analyses confirms the existence of a slab‐like high velocity region in the lower mantle, though the depth extent is not well resolved. On the other hand, the Pacific slab descending from the Izu‐Bonin trench seems to be fingering, that is, high velocity anomalies are penetrating into the lower mantle beneath latitude 26°N, and not penetrating but horizontally bending in the deeper portion of the upper mantle around 29°N.

Journal

Geophysical Research LettersWiley

Published: Aug 1, 1988

References

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