HORMONAL RESPONSES TO EXERCISE AND TRAINING: A SHORT REVIEW

HORMONAL RESPONSES TO EXERCISE AND TRAINING: A SHORT REVIEW Department of Endocrinology, St Bartholomews Hospital, London E C l A 7BE (Received 8 September 1986; returned for revision 7 November 1986;$naIIy revised 3 December 1986; accepted 9 December 1986) INTRODUCTION Acute exercise is a potent modulator of the release of a large number of hormones and has therefore been widely studied as a stimulus to hormonal secretion since the earliest days of radioimmunoassay. It is, however, a very varied and complex physiological stimulus and as a result the hormonal changes may vary widely depending on the precise experimental circumstances. Chronic exercise training may modulate the pattern of basal hormone secretion, as well as modifying the normal acute responses to exercise. With the increasing popularity of exercise training for the maintainence of good health and even the treatment of existing diseases, these hormonal changes have achieved increasing relevance in endocrinological practice. The purpose of this article is therefore to review the literature on the hormonal responses to acute and chronic exercise, to assess the significance of reported changes with training and to consider the role of opioid peptides in the body’s adaptation to exercise training. A C U T E H O R M O N A L http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Clinical Endocrinology Wiley

HORMONAL RESPONSES TO EXERCISE AND TRAINING: A SHORT REVIEW

Clinical Endocrinology, Volume 26 (6) – Jun 1, 1987

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1987 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0300-0664
eISSN
1365-2265
DOI
10.1111/j.1365-2265.1987.tb00832.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Department of Endocrinology, St Bartholomews Hospital, London E C l A 7BE (Received 8 September 1986; returned for revision 7 November 1986;$naIIy revised 3 December 1986; accepted 9 December 1986) INTRODUCTION Acute exercise is a potent modulator of the release of a large number of hormones and has therefore been widely studied as a stimulus to hormonal secretion since the earliest days of radioimmunoassay. It is, however, a very varied and complex physiological stimulus and as a result the hormonal changes may vary widely depending on the precise experimental circumstances. Chronic exercise training may modulate the pattern of basal hormone secretion, as well as modifying the normal acute responses to exercise. With the increasing popularity of exercise training for the maintainence of good health and even the treatment of existing diseases, these hormonal changes have achieved increasing relevance in endocrinological practice. The purpose of this article is therefore to review the literature on the hormonal responses to acute and chronic exercise, to assess the significance of reported changes with training and to consider the role of opioid peptides in the body’s adaptation to exercise training. A C U T E H O R M O N A L

Journal

Clinical EndocrinologyWiley

Published: Jun 1, 1987

References

  • Differences in the metabolic and hormonal response to exercise between racing cyclists and untrained individuals
    Bloom, Bloom; Johnson, Johnson; Park, Park; Rennie, Rennie; Sulaiman, Sulaiman
  • Profiles of selected hormones during menstrual cycles of teenage athletes
    Bonen, Bonen; Belcastro, Belcastro; Ling, Ling; Simpson, Simpson
  • Endurance training effects on plasma hormonal responsiveness and sex hormone excretion
    Bullen, Bullen; Skrinar, Skrinar; Beitins, Beitins; Carr, Carr; Reppert, Reppert; Dotson, Dotson; Fencl, Fencl; Gervino, Gervino; McArthur, McArthur
  • Plasma volume, renin and vasopressin responses to graded exercise after training
    Convertino, Convertino; Keil, Keil; Greenleaf, Greenleaf
  • Effects of exercise on adrenocortical function
    Davies, Davies; Few, Few
  • Effects of physical training in adolescent boys
    Ekblom, Ekblom
  • Pubertal stage differences in hormonal and hematological responses to maximal exercise in males
    Fahey, Fahey; Valle‐Zuris, Valle‐Zuris; Oehlsen, Oehlsen; Trieb, Trieb; Seymour, Seymour
  • Plasma adrenocorticotropin and Cortisol responses to submaximal and exhaustive exercise
    Farrell, Farrell; Gartwaite, Gartwaite; Gustafson, Gustafson
  • Multiple hormonal responses to graded exercise in relation to physical training
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  • Multiple hormonal responses to prolonged exercise in relation to physical training
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  • Endogenous opioid peptides and hypothalamo‐pituitary function
    Howlett, Howlett; Rees, Rees
  • Ovarian hormonal responses to exercise
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  • Human growth hormone (hGH) stimulation tests: the sequential exercise and L‐dopa procedure
    Liberman, Liberman; Cesar, Cesar; Watchenberg, Watchenberg
  • Prolonged low‐intensity exercise raises the serum parathyroid hormone levels
    Ljunghall, Ljunghall; Joborn, Joborn; Roxin, Roxin; Rastad, Rastad; Wide, Wide; ÅKerström, ÅKerström
  • Failure of naloxone to alter exercise‐induced growth hormone and prolactin release in normal men
    Mayer, Mayer; Wessel, Wessel; Kobberling, Kobberling
  • Naloxone inhibits exercise‐induced release of PRL and GH in athletes
    Moretti, Moretti; Fabbri, Fabbri; Gnessi, Gnessi; Cappa, Cappa; Calzolari, Calzolari; Fraioli, Fraioli; Grossman, Grossman; Besser, Besser
  • The thyroid function in young men during prolonged exercise and the effect of energy and sleep deprivation
    Opstad, Opstad; Falch, Falch; ØKtedalen, ØKtedalen; Fonnum, Fonnum; Wergeland, Wergeland
  • Plasma norepinephrine response to exercise before and after training in humans
    Péronnet, Péronnet; Cléroux, Cléroux; Perrault, Perrault; Cousineau, Cousineau; Champlain, Champlain; Nadeau, Nadeau
  • Effects of exercise, altitude and food on blood hormone and metabolite levels
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  • Growth hormone in exercise: comparison of physiological and pharmacological stimuli
    Sutton, Sutton; Lazarus, Lazarus
  • Effect of acute hypoxia on the hormonal response to exercise
    Sutton, Sutton
  • Plasma renin activity, vasopressin concentration and urinary excretory responses to exercise in men
    Wade, Wade; Claybaugh, Claybaugh

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