Historical perspectives and future directions in the surgical management of retroperitoneal sarcoma

Historical perspectives and future directions in the surgical management of retroperitoneal sarcoma INTRODUCTIONSoft tissue sarcomas constitute 1% of solid cancers in adults and 15‐20% of these tumors arise in the retroperitoneum. Retroperitoneal sarcomas (RPS) are therefore extremely rare malignancies (0.15‐0.2%). Although a multitude of histologic subtypes exist for sarcomas in other parts of the body, for RPS the predominant subtypes are liposarcoma (well differentiated and dedifferentiated), followed by leiomyosarcoma. Other, subtypes (eg, solitary fibrous tumor, malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor) are also occasionally found in the retroperitoneum. Given the deep body location, most RPS can reach large tumor sizes before detection and in fact, RPS are among the largest tumors known in the human body. Due to the rarity and dramatic presentation, RPS have fascinated physicians both past and present. Surgery, although often challenging, has always been recognized as the mainstay of treatment and remains so today. This article will review the history and evolution of RPS surgery and conclude with future directions in the management of this unique disease.These are indeed large tumors—can we treat them with surgery?In Western medical literature, the first anatomic description of a large tumor in the retroperitoneum is credited to the Italian anatomist, Giovanni Battista Morgagni. In 1761, in his work entitled De Sedibus et http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Surgical Oncology Wiley

Historical perspectives and future directions in the surgical management of retroperitoneal sarcoma

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Publisher
Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
Copyright
© 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
ISSN
0022-4790
eISSN
1096-9098
D.O.I.
10.1002/jso.24888
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

INTRODUCTIONSoft tissue sarcomas constitute 1% of solid cancers in adults and 15‐20% of these tumors arise in the retroperitoneum. Retroperitoneal sarcomas (RPS) are therefore extremely rare malignancies (0.15‐0.2%). Although a multitude of histologic subtypes exist for sarcomas in other parts of the body, for RPS the predominant subtypes are liposarcoma (well differentiated and dedifferentiated), followed by leiomyosarcoma. Other, subtypes (eg, solitary fibrous tumor, malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor) are also occasionally found in the retroperitoneum. Given the deep body location, most RPS can reach large tumor sizes before detection and in fact, RPS are among the largest tumors known in the human body. Due to the rarity and dramatic presentation, RPS have fascinated physicians both past and present. Surgery, although often challenging, has always been recognized as the mainstay of treatment and remains so today. This article will review the history and evolution of RPS surgery and conclude with future directions in the management of this unique disease.These are indeed large tumors—can we treat them with surgery?In Western medical literature, the first anatomic description of a large tumor in the retroperitoneum is credited to the Italian anatomist, Giovanni Battista Morgagni. In 1761, in his work entitled De Sedibus et

Journal

Journal of Surgical OncologyWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

Keywords: ; ; ;

References

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