Higher education: marketing in a quasi‐commercial service industry

Higher education: marketing in a quasi‐commercial service industry The UK Government is promoting widening participation and asking universities to develop their student intake of 18–30 year‐olds by 50 per cent by 2010. The financing of these changes is encouraging a marketing emphasis shift, as funding is reduced and alternative revenue methods sought. Traditional marketing of charitable educational institutions sought to ensure sufficient student enrolments for solely government‐funded core activities. Further marketing is now seen in quasi‐commercial activities. This paper investigates the need for a further marketing approach to satisfy these government policy changes. Using the comparative method, the paper looks at the complexity of the issues around US and UK higher education and their revenue value conflicts, marketing perspectives and, finally, the differences in perspectives and expectations between commerce and education. As the matter is current and ongoing, the main form of collecting evidence is through personal interview and recent media releases. Copyright © 2003 Henry Stewart Publications http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Nonprofit & Voluntary Sector Marketing Wiley

Higher education: marketing in a quasi‐commercial service industry

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 Henry Stewart Publications
ISSN
1465-4520
eISSN
1479-103X
DOI
10.1002/nvsm.207
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The UK Government is promoting widening participation and asking universities to develop their student intake of 18–30 year‐olds by 50 per cent by 2010. The financing of these changes is encouraging a marketing emphasis shift, as funding is reduced and alternative revenue methods sought. Traditional marketing of charitable educational institutions sought to ensure sufficient student enrolments for solely government‐funded core activities. Further marketing is now seen in quasi‐commercial activities. This paper investigates the need for a further marketing approach to satisfy these government policy changes. Using the comparative method, the paper looks at the complexity of the issues around US and UK higher education and their revenue value conflicts, marketing perspectives and, finally, the differences in perspectives and expectations between commerce and education. As the matter is current and ongoing, the main form of collecting evidence is through personal interview and recent media releases. Copyright © 2003 Henry Stewart Publications

Journal

International Journal of Nonprofit & Voluntary Sector MarketingWiley

Published: May 1, 2003

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