High Visceral Fat Mass and High Liver Fat Are Associated with Resistance to Lifestyle Intervention

High Visceral Fat Mass and High Liver Fat Are Associated with Resistance to Lifestyle Intervention Objective: High visceral adipose tissue (VAT) and high liver fat (LF) are associated with the metabolic syndrome and diabetes. We studied changes in these two fat depots during weight loss and analyzed whether VAT and LF at baseline predict the response to lifestyle intervention. Research Methods and Procedures: One hundred twelve subjects (48 men and 64 women; age, 46 ± 11 years; BMI, 29.2 ± 4.4 kg/m2) were studied after a follow up‐time of 264 ± 60 (SD) days. Insulin sensitivity was estimated from the oral glucose tolerance test. Body fat depots were quantified using magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy. Results: Cross‐sectionally high VAT (r = −0.22, p = 0.02) and high LF (r = −0.36, p < 0.0001) were independently associated with low insulin sensitivity. With intervention, BMI (−3.0%), VAT (−12.0%), and LF (−33.0%) were reduced (all p < 0.001). Insulin sensitivity was improved (+17%, p < 0.01). The changes in BMI (r = −0.41), VAT (r = −0.28), and LF (r = −0.39) were associated with the increase in insulin sensitivity (all p < 0.01). High VAT (r = −0.28, p = 0.01) and high LF (r = −0.38, p < 0.01) at baseline were associated with a lesser increase in insulin sensitivity. Discussion: Baseline values and changes in BMI, VAT, and LF are related to changes in insulin sensitivity during lifestyle intervention. Subjects with high VAT and LF have a lower chance of profiting from lifestyle intervention and may require intensified lifestyle prevention strategies or even pharmacological approaches to improve insulin sensitivity. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Obesity Wiley

High Visceral Fat Mass and High Liver Fat Are Associated with Resistance to Lifestyle Intervention

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
2007 North American Association for the Study of Obesity (NAASO)
ISSN
1930-7381
eISSN
1930-739X
DOI
10.1038/oby.2007.568
pmid
17299127
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Objective: High visceral adipose tissue (VAT) and high liver fat (LF) are associated with the metabolic syndrome and diabetes. We studied changes in these two fat depots during weight loss and analyzed whether VAT and LF at baseline predict the response to lifestyle intervention. Research Methods and Procedures: One hundred twelve subjects (48 men and 64 women; age, 46 ± 11 years; BMI, 29.2 ± 4.4 kg/m2) were studied after a follow up‐time of 264 ± 60 (SD) days. Insulin sensitivity was estimated from the oral glucose tolerance test. Body fat depots were quantified using magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy. Results: Cross‐sectionally high VAT (r = −0.22, p = 0.02) and high LF (r = −0.36, p < 0.0001) were independently associated with low insulin sensitivity. With intervention, BMI (−3.0%), VAT (−12.0%), and LF (−33.0%) were reduced (all p < 0.001). Insulin sensitivity was improved (+17%, p < 0.01). The changes in BMI (r = −0.41), VAT (r = −0.28), and LF (r = −0.39) were associated with the increase in insulin sensitivity (all p < 0.01). High VAT (r = −0.28, p = 0.01) and high LF (r = −0.38, p < 0.01) at baseline were associated with a lesser increase in insulin sensitivity. Discussion: Baseline values and changes in BMI, VAT, and LF are related to changes in insulin sensitivity during lifestyle intervention. Subjects with high VAT and LF have a lower chance of profiting from lifestyle intervention and may require intensified lifestyle prevention strategies or even pharmacological approaches to improve insulin sensitivity.

Journal

ObesityWiley

Published: Feb 1, 2007

References

  • Women and men have similar amounts of liver and intra‐abdominal fat, despite more subcutaneous fat in women: implications for sex differences in markers of cardiovascular risk
    Westerbacka, Westerbacka; Corner, Corner; Tiikkainen, Tiikkainen
  • Acquired obesity is associated with increased liver fat, intra‐abdominal fat, and insulin resistance in young adult monozygotic twins
    Pietilainen, Pietilainen; Rissanen, Rissanen; Kaprio, Kaprio
  • Fatty liver in type 2 diabetes mellitus: relation to regional adiposity, fatty acids, and insulin resistance
    Kelley, Kelley; McKolanis, McKolanis; Hegazi, Hegazi; Kuller, Kuller; Kalhan, Kalhan
  • Molecular evidence supporting the portal theory: a causative link between visceral adiposity and hepatic insulin resistance
    Kabir, Kabir; Catalano, Catalano; Ananthnarayan, Ananthnarayan
  • Polymorphisms in the gene encoding adiponectin receptor 1 are associated with insulin resistance and high liver fat
    Stefan, Stefan; Machicao, Machicao; Staiger, Staiger

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