Heterosexually acquired human immunodeficiency virus infection and the United States blood supply: considerations for screening of potential blood donors

Heterosexually acquired human immunodeficiency virus infection and the United States blood... The impact of heterosexual transmission of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) on the United States blood supply was assessed, and deferral criteria that may exclude potential donors who are at high risk for heterosexually acquired HIV infection were evaluated. Interviews were conducted with 508 HIV‐seropositive blood donors from May 1, 1988, to August 31, 1989 (Phase 1), and with 472 donors from January 1, 1990, to May 31, 1991 (Phase 2), at 20 blood centers. From Phase 1 to Phase 2, the overall HIV prevalence decreased from 0.021 to 0.018 percent (p < 0.001). HIV risk factors among HIV‐1‐seropositive donors were similar during both study phases. Eleven percent of the men and 56 percent of the women reported as their only risk that they had a heterosexual partner who was at increased risk for HIV or was known to have HIV. These percentages were similar during both study periods. During Phase 2, 13 percent of the men and 17 percent of the women with heterosexual transmission risk had a positive serologic test for syphilis, hepatitis B core antibody, or hepatitis C antibody. Among HIV‐ 1‐seropositive donors reporting heterosexual risk, the median numbers of previous‐year and lifetime sex partners for men were 2 and 30, respectively; for women, those numbers were 1 and 7, respectively. Thirty‐one percent of the men and 6 percent of the women reporting heterosexual transmission risk also reported having had syphilis or gonorrhea within 3 years of donation. It is concluded that the impact of heterosexual transmission of HIV infection on transfusion safety is not worsening at this time.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Transfusion Wiley

Heterosexually acquired human immunodeficiency virus infection and the United States blood supply: considerations for screening of potential blood donors

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
1993 AABB
ISSN
0041-1132
eISSN
1537-2995
D.O.I.
10.1046/j.1537-2995.1993.33793325049.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The impact of heterosexual transmission of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) on the United States blood supply was assessed, and deferral criteria that may exclude potential donors who are at high risk for heterosexually acquired HIV infection were evaluated. Interviews were conducted with 508 HIV‐seropositive blood donors from May 1, 1988, to August 31, 1989 (Phase 1), and with 472 donors from January 1, 1990, to May 31, 1991 (Phase 2), at 20 blood centers. From Phase 1 to Phase 2, the overall HIV prevalence decreased from 0.021 to 0.018 percent (p < 0.001). HIV risk factors among HIV‐1‐seropositive donors were similar during both study phases. Eleven percent of the men and 56 percent of the women reported as their only risk that they had a heterosexual partner who was at increased risk for HIV or was known to have HIV. These percentages were similar during both study periods. During Phase 2, 13 percent of the men and 17 percent of the women with heterosexual transmission risk had a positive serologic test for syphilis, hepatitis B core antibody, or hepatitis C antibody. Among HIV‐ 1‐seropositive donors reporting heterosexual risk, the median numbers of previous‐year and lifetime sex partners for men were 2 and 30, respectively; for women, those numbers were 1 and 7, respectively. Thirty‐one percent of the men and 6 percent of the women reporting heterosexual transmission risk also reported having had syphilis or gonorrhea within 3 years of donation. It is concluded that the impact of heterosexual transmission of HIV infection on transfusion safety is not worsening at this time.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

Journal

TransfusionWiley

Published: Jul 1, 1993

References

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