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Henning Moritz Ruben in Memoriam (1914–2004)

Henning Moritz Ruben in Memoriam (1914–2004) M r Valve – the Danish professor of anaesthesiology, – Henning Ruben – died on December 4, 2004, aged 90 years. Ruben had many gifts. Most importantly, and that which distinguished him from most of his fellow medical men, was his talent for analysing and reducing seemingly complex problems into questions to which a simple answer could be found. His invention of the Ruben non‐rebreathing valve (1954) and the Ruben self‐inflating ventilation bag (1957) provides a good example of his ingenuity, which rightly has secured for him a place in the history of medicine. Ruben's devices have since been imitated by many manufacturers. Today, millions of valves and bags, constructed along the lines that he suggested, are in use all over the world. A further testimony to the impact of his self‐inflating bag and valve concept is the fact that similar devices of all makes are still almost universally and affectionately called Ruben bags and valves. When Ruben was not in the arms of his Muse of science, he courted the nine original Muses. At a professional level, he was a talented dancer – the tango his favourite – a dexterous magician and a thoughtful mind reader. Moreover, as if that was not enough, he was an excellent swords‐man, winning a bronze medal in the World Championship in Monte Carlo in 1939, an engaging, eloquent, charming lecturer and, despite his well‐deserved fame, a modest, soft‐spoken gentleman. A much fuller account of this great man's life, career and inventions has recently been published in the series on ‘Resuscitation Greats’ in Resuscitation (2003; 56 : 123–7) by Peter Baskett and John Zorab. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Wiley

Henning Moritz Ruben in Memoriam (1914–2004)

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0001-5172
eISSN
1399-6576
DOI
10.1111/j.1399-6576.2005.00801.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

M r Valve – the Danish professor of anaesthesiology, – Henning Ruben – died on December 4, 2004, aged 90 years. Ruben had many gifts. Most importantly, and that which distinguished him from most of his fellow medical men, was his talent for analysing and reducing seemingly complex problems into questions to which a simple answer could be found. His invention of the Ruben non‐rebreathing valve (1954) and the Ruben self‐inflating ventilation bag (1957) provides a good example of his ingenuity, which rightly has secured for him a place in the history of medicine. Ruben's devices have since been imitated by many manufacturers. Today, millions of valves and bags, constructed along the lines that he suggested, are in use all over the world. A further testimony to the impact of his self‐inflating bag and valve concept is the fact that similar devices of all makes are still almost universally and affectionately called Ruben bags and valves. When Ruben was not in the arms of his Muse of science, he courted the nine original Muses. At a professional level, he was a talented dancer – the tango his favourite – a dexterous magician and a thoughtful mind reader. Moreover, as if that was not enough, he was an excellent swords‐man, winning a bronze medal in the World Championship in Monte Carlo in 1939, an engaging, eloquent, charming lecturer and, despite his well‐deserved fame, a modest, soft‐spoken gentleman. A much fuller account of this great man's life, career and inventions has recently been published in the series on ‘Resuscitation Greats’ in Resuscitation (2003; 56 : 123–7) by Peter Baskett and John Zorab.

Journal

Acta Anaesthesiologica ScandinavicaWiley

Published: Sep 1, 2005

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