Heart rate patterns under stress in three species of macaques

Heart rate patterns under stress in three species of macaques Cardiac responses during one hour exposures to three stressful experimental conditions were compared among juvenile females of three species of the genus Macaca (M. mulatta, M. radiata, and M. fascicularis). M. fascicularis showed the highest overall heart rate, and M. mulatta the lowest, in all three conditions. The principal difference between species was in the pattern of change in heart rate over the test sessions. Heart rate declined during the hour for all three species in the first two conditions (home cage novel environment), and the change was most rapid in M. mulatta and slowest in M. fascicularis. In the third and most stressful condition (physical restraint), each species showed a distinct temporal pattern. Heart rate increased over the hour in M. fascicularis, declined in M. radiata, and increased rapidly then declined gradually in M. mulatta. Individual differences in heart rate tended to be consistent within and across conditions. Correlations between behavioral measures of somatic activity and heart rate were generally modest. The results are in accord with other behavioral and physiological differences obtained for the same subjects, and suggest that responses to environmental stimuli reflect fundamental aspects of temperament that may vary substantially even among closely related species. © 1994 Wiley‐Liss, Inc. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Primatology Wiley

Heart rate patterns under stress in three species of macaques

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/heart-rate-patterns-under-stress-in-three-species-of-macaques-r0wZvJ00JQ
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1994 Wiley‐Liss, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0275-2565
eISSN
1098-2345
D.O.I.
10.1002/ajp.1350330207
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Cardiac responses during one hour exposures to three stressful experimental conditions were compared among juvenile females of three species of the genus Macaca (M. mulatta, M. radiata, and M. fascicularis). M. fascicularis showed the highest overall heart rate, and M. mulatta the lowest, in all three conditions. The principal difference between species was in the pattern of change in heart rate over the test sessions. Heart rate declined during the hour for all three species in the first two conditions (home cage novel environment), and the change was most rapid in M. mulatta and slowest in M. fascicularis. In the third and most stressful condition (physical restraint), each species showed a distinct temporal pattern. Heart rate increased over the hour in M. fascicularis, declined in M. radiata, and increased rapidly then declined gradually in M. mulatta. Individual differences in heart rate tended to be consistent within and across conditions. Correlations between behavioral measures of somatic activity and heart rate were generally modest. The results are in accord with other behavioral and physiological differences obtained for the same subjects, and suggest that responses to environmental stimuli reflect fundamental aspects of temperament that may vary substantially even among closely related species. © 1994 Wiley‐Liss, Inc.

Journal

American Journal of PrimatologyWiley

Published: Jan 1, 1994

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off