Habitat selection by feral cats and dingoes in a semi‐arid woodland environment in central Australia

Habitat selection by feral cats and dingoes in a semi‐arid woodland environment in central... Habitat use by feral cats and dingoes was examined within a heterogeneous semi‐arid woodland site in central Australia over 2 years. Density estimates of feral cats based on tracks were higher in mulga habitat than in open habitat. Isodar analysis implied that this pattern of habitat use by feral cats was consistent with the consumer‐resource model of density‐dependent habitat selection, which is an ideal free solution. The reason why mulga supported higher densities of feral cats was unclear. Foraging success of feral cats may be higher in the mulga because the stalk and ambush hunting tactics typically employed by felids are well suited to dense cover. Mulga may also have offered feral cats more protection from dingo predation. Dingo activity was distributed uniformly across habitats. The dingo isodar was statistically non‐significant, suggesting that habitat selection by dingoes was independent of density. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Austral Ecology Wiley

Habitat selection by feral cats and dingoes in a semi‐arid woodland environment in central Australia

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
1442-9985
eISSN
1442-9993
DOI
10.1046/j.1442-9993.2002.01156.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Habitat use by feral cats and dingoes was examined within a heterogeneous semi‐arid woodland site in central Australia over 2 years. Density estimates of feral cats based on tracks were higher in mulga habitat than in open habitat. Isodar analysis implied that this pattern of habitat use by feral cats was consistent with the consumer‐resource model of density‐dependent habitat selection, which is an ideal free solution. The reason why mulga supported higher densities of feral cats was unclear. Foraging success of feral cats may be higher in the mulga because the stalk and ambush hunting tactics typically employed by felids are well suited to dense cover. Mulga may also have offered feral cats more protection from dingo predation. Dingo activity was distributed uniformly across habitats. The dingo isodar was statistically non‐significant, suggesting that habitat selection by dingoes was independent of density.

Journal

Austral EcologyWiley

Published: Feb 1, 2002

References

  • Maximizing feeding efficiency and minimizing time exposed to predators: A trade‐off in the black‐capped chickadee.
    Lima, Lima
  • Density‐dependent habitat selection in muskrats: A test of the ideal free distribution model.
    Messier, Messier; Virgl, Virgl; Marinelli, Marinelli
  • Hunting behaviour of a sympatric felid and canid in relation to vegetative cover.
    Murray, Murray; Boutin, Boutin; O’Donoghue, O’Donoghue; Nams, Nams

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