Growth of the Eastern Atlantic squid, Loligo forbesi Steenstrup (Mollusca: Cephalopoda)

Growth of the Eastern Atlantic squid, Loligo forbesi Steenstrup (Mollusca: Cephalopoda) Abstract. Loligo forbesi Steenstrup is a commercially and biomedically important species raneing from Scotland to North Africa and from the Azores Islands in the central Atlantic east through the Mediterranean Sea and Red Sea. Eggs were collected from Plymouth. England and from the Azores and the hatchlings were reared to adult size in recirculating seawater systems. Growth data were obtained primarily from mortalities during the course of three culture experiments which lasted 360, 240 and 480 days. Loligo forbesi hatched at a size of 5–9mg (3.0–4.6mm mantle length, ML) and grew to a maximum size of 124g (155 mm ML) in 413 days. In all experiments, growth was exponential in form for at least the first 3 months at rales of 5.8, 5.1 and 3.6% body weight per day (BW/d) at mean temperatures of 14.1, 14.0 and 13.1°C respectively. In one short‐term experiment, month‐old squids grew at 8.0% BW/d at 17.4°C. Growth beyond 3 months was slower and either logarithmic (as described by the power function) or exponential in form. Growth rates gradually declined to 1–2% BW/d, Analyses of mantle length growth confirmed the wet weight results. There was no evidence of sexual dimorphism in the laboratory populations, which were of small size, and the length‐weight (L‐W) relationships were found to be similar to those of field populations. Growth rates during the exponential growth phase appeared very sensitive to temperature, with a 1°C difference changing growth rate by 2% BW/d and producing a three‐fold difference in weight at 90 days post‐hatching. These dramatic effects of temperature on adult size and lifespan in nature are discussed. It is hypothesized that the small size of mature laboratory‐reared squids was due to low culture temperatures during the first 3 months. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aquaculture Research Wiley

Growth of the Eastern Atlantic squid, Loligo forbesi Steenstrup (Mollusca: Cephalopoda)

Aquaculture Research, Volume 20 (1) – Jan 1, 1989

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/growth-of-the-eastern-atlantic-squid-loligo-forbesi-steenstrup-xmBW1d6DSX
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1989 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
1355-557X
eISSN
1365-2109
D.O.I.
10.1111/j.1365-2109.1989.tb00437.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract. Loligo forbesi Steenstrup is a commercially and biomedically important species raneing from Scotland to North Africa and from the Azores Islands in the central Atlantic east through the Mediterranean Sea and Red Sea. Eggs were collected from Plymouth. England and from the Azores and the hatchlings were reared to adult size in recirculating seawater systems. Growth data were obtained primarily from mortalities during the course of three culture experiments which lasted 360, 240 and 480 days. Loligo forbesi hatched at a size of 5–9mg (3.0–4.6mm mantle length, ML) and grew to a maximum size of 124g (155 mm ML) in 413 days. In all experiments, growth was exponential in form for at least the first 3 months at rales of 5.8, 5.1 and 3.6% body weight per day (BW/d) at mean temperatures of 14.1, 14.0 and 13.1°C respectively. In one short‐term experiment, month‐old squids grew at 8.0% BW/d at 17.4°C. Growth beyond 3 months was slower and either logarithmic (as described by the power function) or exponential in form. Growth rates gradually declined to 1–2% BW/d, Analyses of mantle length growth confirmed the wet weight results. There was no evidence of sexual dimorphism in the laboratory populations, which were of small size, and the length‐weight (L‐W) relationships were found to be similar to those of field populations. Growth rates during the exponential growth phase appeared very sensitive to temperature, with a 1°C difference changing growth rate by 2% BW/d and producing a three‐fold difference in weight at 90 days post‐hatching. These dramatic effects of temperature on adult size and lifespan in nature are discussed. It is hypothesized that the small size of mature laboratory‐reared squids was due to low culture temperatures during the first 3 months.

Journal

Aquaculture ResearchWiley

Published: Jan 1, 1989

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off