Group formation of female pigtail macaques ( Macaca nemestrina )

Group formation of female pigtail macaques ( Macaca nemestrina ) Human epidemiological studies have suggested that social variables can modulate the effects of stress on the immune system, and this concept has been gaining increasing attention with positive results emerging from empirical studies using nonhuman primates over the last two decades. Results from a previous study in rhesus monkeys suggested that receiving grooming positively affected recovery of T‐helper and T‐suppressor cells following the initial stress associated with group formation, and this co‐varied with high dominance rank. Thus, the present study was undertaken in order to determine: (1) if the stress effect of formation could be replicated in another species and (2) if social behaviors or dominance rank, given that formation is a stressor, might independently correlate with physiological recovery from the stressor. Eight adult female pigtail macaques were moved from individual cages and simultaneously introduced into an outdoor enclosure along with an adult male, while eight weight‐matched controls remained in individual caging. Behavioral data were collected during the introduction and over 4 weeks thereafter. Blood samples were collected prior to and at intervals for 4 weeks following formation. Compared to control subjects, the test subjects showed an increase in basal cortisol secretion (+28.9%) and a significant decrease in T‐helper cells (‐33.6%), T‐suppressor cells (‐30.8%), and B cells (‐22.5%), while there was a significant increase in white blood cells (+29.5%) 24 hr following formation. When dominance rank and seven behavioral categories were analyzed, only the frequency of receiving grooming significantly predicted change, with animals who received a greater frequency of grooms showing a lesser negative percent change from baseline in the absolute number of T‐helper cells 1 week following formation. The establishment of a dominance hierarchy, apparent within 1 week, was accomplished with no serious fighting and a complete absence of wounding or trauma, suggesting that psychosocial stress was responsible for the physiological changes observed. © 1996 Wiley‐Liss, Inc. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Primatology Wiley

Group formation of female pigtail macaques ( Macaca nemestrina )

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/group-formation-of-female-pigtail-macaques-macaca-nemestrina-0qixhQNDnf
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1996 Wiley‐Liss, Inc.
ISSN
0275-2565
eISSN
1098-2345
D.O.I.
10.1002/(SICI)1098-2345(1996)39:4<263::AID-AJP6>3.0.CO;2-X
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Human epidemiological studies have suggested that social variables can modulate the effects of stress on the immune system, and this concept has been gaining increasing attention with positive results emerging from empirical studies using nonhuman primates over the last two decades. Results from a previous study in rhesus monkeys suggested that receiving grooming positively affected recovery of T‐helper and T‐suppressor cells following the initial stress associated with group formation, and this co‐varied with high dominance rank. Thus, the present study was undertaken in order to determine: (1) if the stress effect of formation could be replicated in another species and (2) if social behaviors or dominance rank, given that formation is a stressor, might independently correlate with physiological recovery from the stressor. Eight adult female pigtail macaques were moved from individual cages and simultaneously introduced into an outdoor enclosure along with an adult male, while eight weight‐matched controls remained in individual caging. Behavioral data were collected during the introduction and over 4 weeks thereafter. Blood samples were collected prior to and at intervals for 4 weeks following formation. Compared to control subjects, the test subjects showed an increase in basal cortisol secretion (+28.9%) and a significant decrease in T‐helper cells (‐33.6%), T‐suppressor cells (‐30.8%), and B cells (‐22.5%), while there was a significant increase in white blood cells (+29.5%) 24 hr following formation. When dominance rank and seven behavioral categories were analyzed, only the frequency of receiving grooming significantly predicted change, with animals who received a greater frequency of grooms showing a lesser negative percent change from baseline in the absolute number of T‐helper cells 1 week following formation. The establishment of a dominance hierarchy, apparent within 1 week, was accomplished with no serious fighting and a complete absence of wounding or trauma, suggesting that psychosocial stress was responsible for the physiological changes observed. © 1996 Wiley‐Liss, Inc.

Journal

American Journal of PrimatologyWiley

Published: Jan 1, 1996

References

  • Flow microfluorometric analysis of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from nonhuman primates: Correlation of phenotype with immune function
    Ahmed‐Ansari, Ahmed‐Ansari; Brodie, Brodie; Fultz, Fultz; Anderson, Anderson; Sell, Sell; McClure, McClure
  • Observational study of behavior: Sampling methods
    Altmann, Altmann
  • Rhesus plasma cortisol response at four dominance positions
    Chamove, Chamove; Bowman, Bowman
  • Reconciliation and redirected affection in rhesus monkeys
    de Waal, de Waal; Yoshihara, Yoshihara
  • Heart rate and social status among male cynomolgus monkeys ( Macaca fascicularis ) housed in disrupted social groupings
    Kaplan, Kaplan; Manuck, Manuck; Gatsonis, Gatsonis
  • The relationship of agonistic and affiliative behavior patterns to cellular immune function among cynomolgus monkeys ( Macaca fascicularis ) living in unstable social groups
    Kaplan, Kaplan; Heise, Heise; Manuck, Manuck; Shively, Shively; Cohen, Cohen; Rabin, Rabin; Kasprowicz, Kasprowicz

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off