Glycated hemoglobin: A powerful tool not used enough in primary care

Glycated hemoglobin: A powerful tool not used enough in primary care Abbreviations:AACCAutonomous community; GPGeneral practitioner; HbA1cGlycated haemoglobin; HDHealth DepartmentINTRODUCTIONGlycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) is one of the most useful and relevant laboratory tests currently available. Not just for monitoring diabetes to adjust treatment and avoid complications, but also for its diagnosis. This aspect is especially crucial in Europe, where the number of people with diabetes is estimated to be 59.8 million (9.1% of the population aged 20‐79), including 23.5 million undiagnosed cases. In addition to its power as a diagnostic and monitoring tool, HbA1c has many advantages when compared to other tests involved in diabetes management. HbA1c is an indicator of the glucose levels in the previous 3 months, it is not invasive, benefits from standardised methodology and sample stability, there is no gap between sample collection in primary care centres and laboratory analysis, and is very affordable. However the potency of any laboratory test, regardless of its intrinsic potential as a diagnostic, monitoring or detection tool, is given for the correct or incorrect use in each patient or specific setting.In 2008, we first detected an inappropriate HbA1c over‐ and also under‐ request in patients with and without diabetes in eight health departments (HDs) in Valencia community. The same results were observed in http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Clinical Laboratory Analysis Wiley

Glycated hemoglobin: A powerful tool not used enough in primary care

Salinas, Maria; López‐Garrigós, Maite; Flores, Emilio; Leiva‐Salinas, Carlos; ,; Valero, Vidal Pérez; Gascón, Félix; Contreras, Isidoro Herrera; Bailen García, Maria Ángeles; Oyonarte, Cristóbal Avivar; Fontana, Esther Roldán; Cantalejo, Fernando Rodríguez; Noval Padillo, José Ángel; González García, M Ángela; Rico, Ignacio Vázquez; Santos, Cristina; Marín, Ángeles Giménez; Señor López Vélez, Maria; García Larios, José Vicente; Luque, Federico Navajas; Tapia, Amado; Solé LLop, Maria Esther; Puente, Juan José; Esteve, Patricia; Avello López, Maria Teresa; Noguero, Emilia Moreno; Follana Vázquez, Ana Maria; Ribes Valles, Jose Luis; Lis Alonso, Mª Luisa Fernández; Muros, Mercedes; Martin, Leopoldo Martin; Pico Picos, Miguel Ángel; Cabrera, Casimira Domínguez; Ruiz, Marta Riaño; Molinos, Juan Ignacio; Colomo, Luis Fernando; Hoyos, Marcos López; Medio, Enrique Prada; Chico, Pilar García; Gómez‐Biedma, Simón; Domínguez, Vicente Granizo; Ruiz, Guadalupe; Navarro, Laura; Pena, Fidel Velasco; Fernández, Carolina Andrés; Carrera, Oscar Herráez; Lorenzo Lozano, Mª Carmen; Martínez, Joaquín Domínguez; Carrera, Oscar Herráez; Gil, Maria Teresa; Rodríguez Rodríguez, Mª Ángeles; Poncela García, M. Victoria; Rabadán, Luis; Villamandos, Vicente; García, Nuria Fernández; González Redondo, José Miguel; García, Cesáreo; Menéndez, Luis García; Sastre, Pilar Álvarez; Gómez, Ovidio; LLovet, Mabel; Serrat, Nuria; Baz, Mª José; Zaro, Maria José; Plata, M Carmen; Yun, Pura García; Sánchez, Milagrosa Macías; Martin, Javier; Suarez, Lola Máiz; Ponce, Berta González; Magadan, Concepcion; Andrade Olivie, M. Amalia; Rodríguez, Pastora; Herranz Puebla, M. Mercedes; Soto, Antonio Buño; Cava, Fernando; Santos, Raquel Guillén; Pascual, Tomas; Larramendi, Carmen Hernando; Sánchez, Raquel Blázquez; Díaz, Pilar; Díaz, Ana; Collía, Marta García; Cuadrado Cenzual, Maria Ángeles; Menchero, Santiago Prieto; Carmen Gallego Ramírez, María; Quilez Fernández, José Luis; Albaladejo, Maria Dolores; López Yepes, Maria Luisa; Martínez, Alfonso Pérez; Urrutia, Antonio López; Chércoles, Adolfo Garrido; Medina, Carmen Mar; Zugaza, M Carmen; Eguileor, Manuel; Pesudo, Silvia; Vinuesa, Carmen; Díaz, Julián; Graells, Marisa; Benítez, Diego Benítez; Carratalá, Arturo; Tormo, Consuelo; Miralles, Francisco; Miralles, Amparo; Barberà, José Luis; Molina, Juan; Yago, Martin; Ortuño, Mario; Martínez Llopis, Maria José; Estañ, Nuria; Molina, Ricardo; Ferrero, Juan Antonio; Marro, Begoña Laiz; Marcaida, Goitzane

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Publisher
Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
ISSN
0887-8013
eISSN
1098-2825
D.O.I.
10.1002/jcla.22310
Publisher site
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Abstract

Abbreviations:AACCAutonomous community; GPGeneral practitioner; HbA1cGlycated haemoglobin; HDHealth DepartmentINTRODUCTIONGlycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) is one of the most useful and relevant laboratory tests currently available. Not just for monitoring diabetes to adjust treatment and avoid complications, but also for its diagnosis. This aspect is especially crucial in Europe, where the number of people with diabetes is estimated to be 59.8 million (9.1% of the population aged 20‐79), including 23.5 million undiagnosed cases. In addition to its power as a diagnostic and monitoring tool, HbA1c has many advantages when compared to other tests involved in diabetes management. HbA1c is an indicator of the glucose levels in the previous 3 months, it is not invasive, benefits from standardised methodology and sample stability, there is no gap between sample collection in primary care centres and laboratory analysis, and is very affordable. However the potency of any laboratory test, regardless of its intrinsic potential as a diagnostic, monitoring or detection tool, is given for the correct or incorrect use in each patient or specific setting.In 2008, we first detected an inappropriate HbA1c over‐ and also under‐ request in patients with and without diabetes in eight health departments (HDs) in Valencia community. The same results were observed in

Journal

Journal of Clinical Laboratory AnalysisWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

Keywords: ; ; ;

References

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