Global and regional climate in 2003

Global and regional climate in 2003 ferences between years are small, rankings can still change. The average temperature near the surface of the earth in 2003 in the new analysis was 0.49 degC (with a ± 2 standard errors range of ±0.06 degC) above the 1961–90 average (Fig. 1(b)); 2003 was the third warmest in the 143-year series in both analyses – the warmest year so far has been 1998 at 0.54 ±0.06 degC above average in the new analysis. All the ten warmest years globally have occurred in the 13 years since 1990, including each year since 1997. The potential warmth of 2003 was reduced by the termination, early in the year, of the weak 2002 El Niño event in the eastern tropical Pacific. The annual anomaly of 0.66 ±0.07 degC for the Northern Hemisphere in 2003 equalled the previous record set in 1998 (Fig. 1(c)). In the Southern Hemisphere, the annual anomaly for 2003, 0.36 ±0.06 degC, was the third highest on record (Fig. 1(d)). The tropical belt 20°N to 20°S had its equal second warmest year (Fig. 1(e)); the extratropical Northern Hemisphere had its second warmest (Fig. 1(f ), though it was only marginally warmer than 2001 and 2002), but in http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Weather Wiley

Global and regional climate in 2003

Weather, Volume 59 (6) – Jun 1, 2004

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© CrownCopyright © 2004. Royal Meteorological Society
ISSN
0043-1656
eISSN
1477-8696
DOI
10.1256/wea.66.04
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ferences between years are small, rankings can still change. The average temperature near the surface of the earth in 2003 in the new analysis was 0.49 degC (with a ± 2 standard errors range of ±0.06 degC) above the 1961–90 average (Fig. 1(b)); 2003 was the third warmest in the 143-year series in both analyses – the warmest year so far has been 1998 at 0.54 ±0.06 degC above average in the new analysis. All the ten warmest years globally have occurred in the 13 years since 1990, including each year since 1997. The potential warmth of 2003 was reduced by the termination, early in the year, of the weak 2002 El Niño event in the eastern tropical Pacific. The annual anomaly of 0.66 ±0.07 degC for the Northern Hemisphere in 2003 equalled the previous record set in 1998 (Fig. 1(c)). In the Southern Hemisphere, the annual anomaly for 2003, 0.36 ±0.06 degC, was the third highest on record (Fig. 1(d)). The tropical belt 20°N to 20°S had its equal second warmest year (Fig. 1(e)); the extratropical Northern Hemisphere had its second warmest (Fig. 1(f ), though it was only marginally warmer than 2001 and 2002), but in

Journal

WeatherWiley

Published: Jun 1, 2004

References

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