Geophysical implications from relocations of Tibetan Earthquakes; Hot lithosphere

Geophysical implications from relocations of Tibetan Earthquakes; Hot lithosphere ISC locations for earthquakes beneath Tibet indicate a random distribution of events down to a depth of about 50 km. This distribution would be expected from a relatively cool crust which would allow the seismo‐genic zone to extend to such depths. A detailed investigation of the Tibetan earthquakes, with magnitude greater than 5.5 from 1964 to 1986, yields a distinctly different picture. Waveform modeling of depth phases indicates that only a few events from this population is actually deeper than 25 km. These few events occurred near the edges of the Plateau where active subduction is occurring as suggested by the thrust‐like nature of their mechanisms. The events, averaging the entire population, occurred earlier than indicated by the ISC by about 3 seconds which leads to about a 1.5% and 0.5% over estimation of Pn and Sn velocities respectively applying ISC tables and standard flat‐layered models. A more serious error occurs if the Pn and Sn velocities are determined by correcting for source depth but assuming the ISC origin times. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Geophysical Research Letters Wiley

Geophysical implications from relocations of Tibetan Earthquakes; Hot lithosphere

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/geophysical-implications-from-relocations-of-tibetan-earthquakes-hot-U0q0S3lC7F
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1991 by the American Geophysical Union.
ISSN
0094-8276
eISSN
1944-8007
DOI
10.1029/91GL02865
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ISC locations for earthquakes beneath Tibet indicate a random distribution of events down to a depth of about 50 km. This distribution would be expected from a relatively cool crust which would allow the seismo‐genic zone to extend to such depths. A detailed investigation of the Tibetan earthquakes, with magnitude greater than 5.5 from 1964 to 1986, yields a distinctly different picture. Waveform modeling of depth phases indicates that only a few events from this population is actually deeper than 25 km. These few events occurred near the edges of the Plateau where active subduction is occurring as suggested by the thrust‐like nature of their mechanisms. The events, averaging the entire population, occurred earlier than indicated by the ISC by about 3 seconds which leads to about a 1.5% and 0.5% over estimation of Pn and Sn velocities respectively applying ISC tables and standard flat‐layered models. A more serious error occurs if the Pn and Sn velocities are determined by correcting for source depth but assuming the ISC origin times.

Journal

Geophysical Research LettersWiley

Published: Dec 1, 1991

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off