Geomorphic principles of terrain organization and vegetation gradients

Geomorphic principles of terrain organization and vegetation gradients Abstract. Moisture and nutrient gradients consistently explain much of the variation in plant species composition and abundance, but these gradients are not spatially explicit and only reveal species responses to resource levels. This study links these abstract gradients to quantitative, spatial models of hill‐slope assembly. A gradient analysis in the mixed‐wood boreal forest demonstrates that patterns of upland vegetation distribution are correlated to soil moisture and nutrient gradients. Variation in species abundance with time since the last fire is removed from the gradient analysis in order to avoid confounding the physical environment gradients. The physical‐environment gradients are related to qualitative positions on the hill slope i.e. crest, mid‐slope, bottom‐slope. However, hill‐slope shape can be quantitatively described and compared by fitting allometric equations to the slope profiles. Using these equations, we show that hill‐slope profiles on similar surficial materials have similar parameters, despite coming from widely separated locations. We then quantitatively link the moisture and nutrient gradients to the equations. Moisture and nutrients significantly increase as distance down‐slope from the ridgeline increases. Corresponding vegetation composition changes too. These relationships characterize the general pattern of vegetation change down most hill slopes in the area. Since hill slopes are a universal feature of all landscapes, these principles may characterize landscape scale spatial patterns of vegetation in many environments. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Vegetation Science Wiley

Geomorphic principles of terrain organization and vegetation gradients

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/geomorphic-principles-of-terrain-organization-and-vegetation-gradients-kbmMqMpa0d
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
2000 IAVS ‐ the International Association of Vegetation Science
ISSN
1100-9233
eISSN
1654-1103
DOI
10.2307/3236776
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract. Moisture and nutrient gradients consistently explain much of the variation in plant species composition and abundance, but these gradients are not spatially explicit and only reveal species responses to resource levels. This study links these abstract gradients to quantitative, spatial models of hill‐slope assembly. A gradient analysis in the mixed‐wood boreal forest demonstrates that patterns of upland vegetation distribution are correlated to soil moisture and nutrient gradients. Variation in species abundance with time since the last fire is removed from the gradient analysis in order to avoid confounding the physical environment gradients. The physical‐environment gradients are related to qualitative positions on the hill slope i.e. crest, mid‐slope, bottom‐slope. However, hill‐slope shape can be quantitatively described and compared by fitting allometric equations to the slope profiles. Using these equations, we show that hill‐slope profiles on similar surficial materials have similar parameters, despite coming from widely separated locations. We then quantitatively link the moisture and nutrient gradients to the equations. Moisture and nutrients significantly increase as distance down‐slope from the ridgeline increases. Corresponding vegetation composition changes too. These relationships characterize the general pattern of vegetation change down most hill slopes in the area. Since hill slopes are a universal feature of all landscapes, these principles may characterize landscape scale spatial patterns of vegetation in many environments.

Journal

Journal of Vegetation ScienceWiley

Published: Feb 1, 2000

References

  • Spatial aggregation of complex terrain
    Band, Band
  • The significance of topology for modeling the surface hydrology of fluvial landscapes
    Dawes, Dawes; Short, Short
  • Predicting the distribution of shrub species in southern California from climate and terrain‐derived variables
    Franklin, Franklin
  • Wildfires in the western Canadian boreal forest: Landscape patterns and ecosystem management
    Johnson, Johnson; Miyanishi, Miyanishi; Weir, Weir

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off