Geographical distributions of spiny pocket mice in South America: insights from predictive models

Geographical distributions of spiny pocket mice in South America: insights from predictive models Aim Predictive models of species’ distributions use occurrence records and environmental data to produce a model of the species’ requirements and a map of its potential distribution. To determine regions of suitable environmental conditions and assess biogeographical questions regarding their ranges, we modelled the potential geographical distributions of two spiny pocket mice (Rodentia: Heteromyidae) in north‐western South America. Location North‐western South America. Methods We used the Genetic Algorithm for Rule‐Set Prediction (GARP), environmental data from GIS maps and georeferenced collection localities from a recent systematic review of Heteromys australis and H. anomalus to produce the models. Results GARP models indicate the potential presence of H. australis throughout mesic montane regions of north‐western South America, as well as in some lowland regions of moderately high precipitation. In contrast, H. anomalus is predicted to occur primarily in drier areas of the Caribbean coast and rain‐shadowed valleys of the Andes. Conclusions The models support the disjunct status of the population of H. australis in the Cordillera de Mérida, but predict a continuous distribution between known populations of H. anomalus in the upper Magdalena Valley and the Caribbean coast. Regions of suitable environmental conditions exist disjunct from known distributional areas for both species, suggesting possible historical restrictions to their ranges. This technique holds wide application to other study systems. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Global Ecology Wiley

Geographical distributions of spiny pocket mice in South America: insights from predictive models

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
1466-822X
eISSN
1466-8238
D.O.I.
10.1046/j.1466-822X.2002.00275.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Aim Predictive models of species’ distributions use occurrence records and environmental data to produce a model of the species’ requirements and a map of its potential distribution. To determine regions of suitable environmental conditions and assess biogeographical questions regarding their ranges, we modelled the potential geographical distributions of two spiny pocket mice (Rodentia: Heteromyidae) in north‐western South America. Location North‐western South America. Methods We used the Genetic Algorithm for Rule‐Set Prediction (GARP), environmental data from GIS maps and georeferenced collection localities from a recent systematic review of Heteromys australis and H. anomalus to produce the models. Results GARP models indicate the potential presence of H. australis throughout mesic montane regions of north‐western South America, as well as in some lowland regions of moderately high precipitation. In contrast, H. anomalus is predicted to occur primarily in drier areas of the Caribbean coast and rain‐shadowed valleys of the Andes. Conclusions The models support the disjunct status of the population of H. australis in the Cordillera de Mérida, but predict a continuous distribution between known populations of H. anomalus in the upper Magdalena Valley and the Caribbean coast. Regions of suitable environmental conditions exist disjunct from known distributional areas for both species, suggesting possible historical restrictions to their ranges. This technique holds wide application to other study systems.

Journal

Global EcologyWiley

Published: Mar 1, 2002

References

  • The geographic range: size, shape, boundaries, and internal structure
    Brown, Brown; Stevens, Stevens; Kaufman, Kaufman
  • Preliminary distributional analysis of US endangered bird species
    Godown, Godown; Peterson, Peterson
  • Modelling faunal responses to climatic gradients with GIS: land snails as a case study
    Kadmon, Kadmon; Heller, Heller
  • Sensitivity of distributional prediction algorithms to geographic data completeness
    Peterson, Peterson; Cohoon, Cohoon
  • Geographic analysis of conservation priority: endemic birds and mammals in Veracruz, Mexico
    Peterson, Peterson; Egbert, Egbert; Sánchez‐Cordero, Sánchez‐Cordero; Price, Price
  • Analysis of the distribution of insectivorous bats in Israel
    Yom‐Tov, Yom‐Tov; Kadmon, Kadmon

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