Genotoxic and mutagenic properties of Ni and NiO nanoparticles investigated by comet assay, γ‐H2AX staining, Hprt mutation assay and ToxTracker reporter cell lines

Genotoxic and mutagenic properties of Ni and NiO nanoparticles investigated by comet assay,... Nickel (Ni) compounds are classified as carcinogenic to humans but the underlying mechanisms are still poorly understood. Furthermore, effects related to nanoparticles (NPs) of Ni have not been fully elucidated. The aim of this study was to investigate genotoxicity and mutagenicity of Ni and NiO NPs and compare the effect to soluble Ni from NiCl2. We employed different models; i.e., exposure of (1) human bronchial epithelial cells (HBEC) followed by DNA strand break analysis (comet assay and γ‐H2AX staining); (2) six different mouse embryonic stem (mES) reporter cell lines (ToxTracker) that are constructed to exhibit fluorescence upon the induction of various pathways of relevance for (geno)toxicity and cancer; and (3) mES cells followed by mutagenicity testing (Hprt assay). The results showed increased DNA strand breaks (comet assay) for the NiO NPs and at higher doses also for the Ni NPs whereas no effects were observed for Ni ions/complexes from NiCl2. By employing the reporter cell lines, oxidative stress was observed as the main toxic mechanism and protein unfolding occurred at cytotoxic doses for all three Ni‐containing materials. Oxidative stress was also detected in the HBEC cells following NP‐exposure. None of these materials induced the reporter related to direct DNA damage and stalled replication forks. A small but statistically significant increase in Hprt mutations was observed for NiO but only at one dose. We conclude that Ni and NiO NPs show more pronounced (geno)toxic effects compared to Ni ions/complexes, indicating more serious health concerns. Environ. Mol. Mutagen. 59:211–222, 2018. © 2017 The Authors Environmental and Molecular Mutagenesis published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Environmental Mutagen Society http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Environmental and Molecular Mutagenesis Wiley

Genotoxic and mutagenic properties of Ni and NiO nanoparticles investigated by comet assay, γ‐H2AX staining, Hprt mutation assay and ToxTracker reporter cell lines

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Publisher
Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
Copyright
© 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
ISSN
0893-6692
eISSN
1098-2280
D.O.I.
10.1002/em.22163
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Nickel (Ni) compounds are classified as carcinogenic to humans but the underlying mechanisms are still poorly understood. Furthermore, effects related to nanoparticles (NPs) of Ni have not been fully elucidated. The aim of this study was to investigate genotoxicity and mutagenicity of Ni and NiO NPs and compare the effect to soluble Ni from NiCl2. We employed different models; i.e., exposure of (1) human bronchial epithelial cells (HBEC) followed by DNA strand break analysis (comet assay and γ‐H2AX staining); (2) six different mouse embryonic stem (mES) reporter cell lines (ToxTracker) that are constructed to exhibit fluorescence upon the induction of various pathways of relevance for (geno)toxicity and cancer; and (3) mES cells followed by mutagenicity testing (Hprt assay). The results showed increased DNA strand breaks (comet assay) for the NiO NPs and at higher doses also for the Ni NPs whereas no effects were observed for Ni ions/complexes from NiCl2. By employing the reporter cell lines, oxidative stress was observed as the main toxic mechanism and protein unfolding occurred at cytotoxic doses for all three Ni‐containing materials. Oxidative stress was also detected in the HBEC cells following NP‐exposure. None of these materials induced the reporter related to direct DNA damage and stalled replication forks. A small but statistically significant increase in Hprt mutations was observed for NiO but only at one dose. We conclude that Ni and NiO NPs show more pronounced (geno)toxic effects compared to Ni ions/complexes, indicating more serious health concerns. Environ. Mol. Mutagen. 59:211–222, 2018. © 2017 The Authors Environmental and Molecular Mutagenesis published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Environmental Mutagen Society

Journal

Environmental and Molecular MutagenesisWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

Keywords: ; ; ; ;

References

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