Genetics and Genomics of Core Short Tandem Repeat Loci Used in Human Identity Testing

Genetics and Genomics of Core Short Tandem Repeat Loci Used in Human Identity Testing ABSTRACT: Over the past decade, the human identity testing community has settled on a set of core short tandem repeat (STR) loci that are widely used for DNA typing applications. A variety of commercial kits enable robust amplification of these core STR loci. A brief history is presented regarding the selection of core autosomal and Y‐chromosomal STR markers. The physical location of each STR locus in the human genome is delineated and allele ranges and variants observed in human populations are summarized as are mutation rates observed from parentage testing. Internet resources for additional information on core STR loci are reviewed. Additional topics are also discussed, including potential linkage of STR loci to genetic disease‐causing genes, probabilistic predictions of sample ethnicity, and desirable characteristics for additional STR loci that may be added in the future to the current core loci. These core STR loci, which form the basis for DNA databases worldwide, will continue to play an important role in forensic science for many years to come. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Forensic Sciences Wiley

Genetics and Genomics of Core Short Tandem Repeat Loci Used in Human Identity Testing

Journal of Forensic Sciences, Volume 51 (2) – Mar 1, 2006

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0022-1198
eISSN
1556-4029
D.O.I.
10.1111/j.1556-4029.2006.00046.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ABSTRACT: Over the past decade, the human identity testing community has settled on a set of core short tandem repeat (STR) loci that are widely used for DNA typing applications. A variety of commercial kits enable robust amplification of these core STR loci. A brief history is presented regarding the selection of core autosomal and Y‐chromosomal STR markers. The physical location of each STR locus in the human genome is delineated and allele ranges and variants observed in human populations are summarized as are mutation rates observed from parentage testing. Internet resources for additional information on core STR loci are reviewed. Additional topics are also discussed, including potential linkage of STR loci to genetic disease‐causing genes, probabilistic predictions of sample ethnicity, and desirable characteristics for additional STR loci that may be added in the future to the current core loci. These core STR loci, which form the basis for DNA databases worldwide, will continue to play an important role in forensic science for many years to come.

Journal

Journal of Forensic SciencesWiley

Published: Mar 1, 2006

References

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  • Validation of a 16‐locus fluorescent multiplex system
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  • Integration of the cytogenetic map with the draft human genome sequence
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  • Analysis of eight STR loci in two Hungarian populations
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  • Evaluation of gastrointestinal cancer tissues as a source of genetic information for forensic investigations by using STRs
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  • An exhaustive DNA micro‐satellite map of the human genome using high performance computing
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