Gamma Ray Attenuation Studies of Interception From Sitka Spruce: Some Evidence for an Additional Transport Mechanism

Gamma Ray Attenuation Studies of Interception From Sitka Spruce: Some Evidence for an Additional... Various forest canopy characteristics of stands of Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis (Bong.) Carr.), including canopy density, the aerodynamic resistance to the transfer of water vapor, and the rates of change of drainage and evaporation of water with respect to canopy storage, were investigated using direct measurements of canopy mass and water storage. The measurements, made at sites located in Wales and Scotland, utilized the attenuation of a horizontal beam of gamma rays which was arranged to scan through the canopy at different levels. The aerodynamic resistance to the transport of water vapor from the canopy to a reference level 5 m above mean tree height was found to be consistent with the value of 3.5 s m−1, determined from earlier modeling studies (I. R. Calder, 1977). This value is, however, lower and shows less wind speed dependence than would be expected from conventional formulae which are based on eddy diffusion theory and tree height. The possibility of explaining these discrepancies in terms of an additional transport mechanism involving large‐scale eddies is discussed. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Water Resources Research Wiley

Gamma Ray Attenuation Studies of Interception From Sitka Spruce: Some Evidence for an Additional Transport Mechanism

Water Resources Research, Volume 22 (3) – Mar 1, 1986

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1986 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0043-1397
eISSN
1944-7973
D.O.I.
10.1029/WR022i003p00409
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Various forest canopy characteristics of stands of Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis (Bong.) Carr.), including canopy density, the aerodynamic resistance to the transfer of water vapor, and the rates of change of drainage and evaporation of water with respect to canopy storage, were investigated using direct measurements of canopy mass and water storage. The measurements, made at sites located in Wales and Scotland, utilized the attenuation of a horizontal beam of gamma rays which was arranged to scan through the canopy at different levels. The aerodynamic resistance to the transport of water vapor from the canopy to a reference level 5 m above mean tree height was found to be consistent with the value of 3.5 s m−1, determined from earlier modeling studies (I. R. Calder, 1977). This value is, however, lower and shows less wind speed dependence than would be expected from conventional formulae which are based on eddy diffusion theory and tree height. The possibility of explaining these discrepancies in terms of an additional transport mechanism involving large‐scale eddies is discussed.

Journal

Water Resources ResearchWiley

Published: Mar 1, 1986

References

  • The use of a wet‐surface weighing lysimeter system in rainfall interception studies of heather (Calluna Vulgaris)
    Calder, I. R.; Hall, R. J.; Harding, R. J.; Wright, I. R.
  • The scaling of flow in vegatative structures
    Grant, R. H.
  • Evaporation and environment
    Monteith, J. L.
  • Resistance of a partially wet canopy: Whose equation fails?
    Monteith, J. L.

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