Gallbladder stones and gallbladder polyps associated with increased risk of colorectal adenoma in men

Gallbladder stones and gallbladder polyps associated with increased risk of colorectal adenoma in... IntroductionColorectal cancer is one of the most common cancers worldwide, especially in developed countries. Most cases of colorectal cancer develop via an adenoma to carcinoma sequence. Therefore, early detection and removal of colorectal adenomas during colonoscopy may potentially prevent colorectal cancer. For this purpose, the etiologies and risk factors of colorectal adenomas, such as male gender, older age, obesity, metabolic syndrome, glucose intolerance, and hyperlipidemia, have taken on broader significance. Similarly, gallbladder polyps share some risk factors, including metabolic syndrome, male gender, age, and obesity. Moreover, there is a common epitope found on the epithelium of gallbladder and that of colorectal mucosa. In addition, gallbladder stones also appear to be associated with age, obesity, blood glucose, and blood pressure, although they are more prevalent in women.Gallbladder polyps and gallbladder stones share some risk factors, such as age, obesity, and metabolic abnormalities, with colorectal polyps. However, little is known about the association of gallbladder polyps and gallbladder stones with colorectal polyps. Although two studies showed a positive association between gallbladder polyps and colorectal adenomas or adenocarcinoma, only one study revealed that gallbladder polyps were risk factors for colorectal adenomas. Yamaji et al. showed strong association between gallbladder stones and colorectal http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Wiley

Gallbladder stones and gallbladder polyps associated with increased risk of colorectal adenoma in men

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Publisher
Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
Copyright
© 2018 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd
ISSN
0815-9319
eISSN
1440-1746
D.O.I.
10.1111/jgh.14006
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

IntroductionColorectal cancer is one of the most common cancers worldwide, especially in developed countries. Most cases of colorectal cancer develop via an adenoma to carcinoma sequence. Therefore, early detection and removal of colorectal adenomas during colonoscopy may potentially prevent colorectal cancer. For this purpose, the etiologies and risk factors of colorectal adenomas, such as male gender, older age, obesity, metabolic syndrome, glucose intolerance, and hyperlipidemia, have taken on broader significance. Similarly, gallbladder polyps share some risk factors, including metabolic syndrome, male gender, age, and obesity. Moreover, there is a common epitope found on the epithelium of gallbladder and that of colorectal mucosa. In addition, gallbladder stones also appear to be associated with age, obesity, blood glucose, and blood pressure, although they are more prevalent in women.Gallbladder polyps and gallbladder stones share some risk factors, such as age, obesity, and metabolic abnormalities, with colorectal polyps. However, little is known about the association of gallbladder polyps and gallbladder stones with colorectal polyps. Although two studies showed a positive association between gallbladder polyps and colorectal adenomas or adenocarcinoma, only one study revealed that gallbladder polyps were risk factors for colorectal adenomas. Yamaji et al. showed strong association between gallbladder stones and colorectal

Journal

Journal of Gastroenterology and HepatologyWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

Keywords: ; ; ;

References

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