Frontal cortex and behavior

Frontal cortex and behavior nent is located in the caudal-basal-medial part of the frontal lobe and contains the paralimbic cortex of the anterior cingulate, parolfactory , and caudal orbitofrontal regions. The third component is more rostral in location and contains the heteromodal (high-order) association cortex in areas 9, 10, 11, 12 (rostral), 45, 46, and 47 of Brodmann (see Figure) C241. The terms “prefrontal cortex” and the associated “frontal lobe syndrome” generally refer only to the paralimbic and heteromodal components. These are the regions of the frontal lobe that will be emphasized in the following comments. The case of Phineas Gage (also known as the Boston Crowbar Case), described more than a century ago by Harlow [ 101, remains paradigmatic for research on the frontal lobes. Gage was a reliable and upright foreman who became profane, irascible, and irresponsible following an accident during which a tamping rod was blown through his frontal lobes. The many reports that have been published since Harlow’s paper have provided additional support for the conclusions derived from the case of Phineas Gage, namely, that frontal lobe damage can lead to dramatic alterations of personality and conduct while leaving most cognitive and sensory-motor functions relatively intact. Over the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annals of Neurology Wiley

Frontal cortex and behavior

Annals of Neurology, Volume 19 (4) – Apr 1, 1986

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1986 American Neurological Association
ISSN
0364-5134
eISSN
1531-8249
DOI
10.1002/ana.410190403
pmid
3707083
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

nent is located in the caudal-basal-medial part of the frontal lobe and contains the paralimbic cortex of the anterior cingulate, parolfactory , and caudal orbitofrontal regions. The third component is more rostral in location and contains the heteromodal (high-order) association cortex in areas 9, 10, 11, 12 (rostral), 45, 46, and 47 of Brodmann (see Figure) C241. The terms “prefrontal cortex” and the associated “frontal lobe syndrome” generally refer only to the paralimbic and heteromodal components. These are the regions of the frontal lobe that will be emphasized in the following comments. The case of Phineas Gage (also known as the Boston Crowbar Case), described more than a century ago by Harlow [ 101, remains paradigmatic for research on the frontal lobes. Gage was a reliable and upright foreman who became profane, irascible, and irresponsible following an accident during which a tamping rod was blown through his frontal lobes. The many reports that have been published since Harlow’s paper have provided additional support for the conclusions derived from the case of Phineas Gage, namely, that frontal lobe damage can lead to dramatic alterations of personality and conduct while leaving most cognitive and sensory-motor functions relatively intact. Over the

Journal

Annals of NeurologyWiley

Published: Apr 1, 1986

References

  • Human autonomy and the frontal lobes. I. Imitation and utilization behavior: a neuropsychological study of 75 patients
    Lhermitte, Lhermitte; Pillon, Pillon; Serdaru, Serdaru
  • Cortical regulation of selective attention in man: a regional cerebral blood flow study
    Roland, Roland
  • The orbitofrontal cortex: neuronal activity in the behaving monkey
    Thorpe, Thorpe; Rolls, Rolls; Maddison, Maddison

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