From the Editor

From the Editor The presence of China and Chinese communities in Latin America and the Caribbean stretches back well over 150 years, beginning with the importation of labor, mostly of male Chinese, who frequently worked in slave‐like conditions on railroads and plantations. Demographic shifts and migration to urban areas created conditions for Chinese to become restaurant and small grocery store owners. After World War II, most Chinese migrants to Latin America came from Hong Kong and Taiwan rather than mainland China. It was only after 1979 with mainland China's enactment of economic reforms and encouragement of greater mobility that more mainland Chinese migrants reached the shores of Latin America and, especially after 2005, catalyzed a variety of investment strategies, entrepreneurial activities, and settlement patterns. While the early history of Chinese migration to Latin America has been well documented, research and analysis of the Chinese presence in Latin America from the 1980s onward, especially over the last two decades, is less robust. The special dossier in this issue, “Entrepreneurship, Artisans, and Traders: The Remaking of China‐Latin American Economies,” edited by Juliane Müller and Rudi Colloredo Mansfeld, constitutes an ambitious effort to examine how Chinese migrants have been engaged in small business and trading http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Latin American & Caribbean Anthropology Wiley

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 2018 American Anthropological Association
ISSN
1935-4932
eISSN
1935-4940
D.O.I.
10.1111/jlca.12340
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The presence of China and Chinese communities in Latin America and the Caribbean stretches back well over 150 years, beginning with the importation of labor, mostly of male Chinese, who frequently worked in slave‐like conditions on railroads and plantations. Demographic shifts and migration to urban areas created conditions for Chinese to become restaurant and small grocery store owners. After World War II, most Chinese migrants to Latin America came from Hong Kong and Taiwan rather than mainland China. It was only after 1979 with mainland China's enactment of economic reforms and encouragement of greater mobility that more mainland Chinese migrants reached the shores of Latin America and, especially after 2005, catalyzed a variety of investment strategies, entrepreneurial activities, and settlement patterns. While the early history of Chinese migration to Latin America has been well documented, research and analysis of the Chinese presence in Latin America from the 1980s onward, especially over the last two decades, is less robust. The special dossier in this issue, “Entrepreneurship, Artisans, and Traders: The Remaking of China‐Latin American Economies,” edited by Juliane Müller and Rudi Colloredo Mansfeld, constitutes an ambitious effort to examine how Chinese migrants have been engaged in small business and trading

Journal

Journal of Latin American & Caribbean AnthropologyWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

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