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From Social Exclusion to Supported Inclusion: Adults with Intellectual Disability Discuss Their Lived Experiences of a Structured Social Group

From Social Exclusion to Supported Inclusion: Adults with Intellectual Disability Discuss Their... IntroductionBetter understanding the effects of social exclusion on adults with intellectual disability is a high priority for the community in terms of the social, health and economic costs that result as a consequence of social exclusion. Social exclusion, loneliness and a lack of friends present many people with intellectual disability with a health and well‐being triple jeopardy (McVilly et al. ). Social inclusion can be described as not only being present in a community, but also having meaningful social connections and participating in fulfilling social activities (Cummins & Lau ; Hall ; Overmars‐Marx et al. ). Participation in meaningful social activities has been demonstrated to have a significant positive impact on loneliness for people with intellectual disability (e.g. Stancliffe et al. ; Wilson et al. ). Yet, many people with intellectual disability remain socially isolated, and hence lonely, as they require support to access social opportunities and face added physical barriers. One major barrier for people with intellectual disability to regularly access and socialize with friends has been noted to be a lack of travel skills (Department of Health, ). Although the association is not clear, Gilmore & Cuskelly () suggested that the ramifications of loneliness and social exclusion could potentially contribute to http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities Wiley

From Social Exclusion to Supported Inclusion: Adults with Intellectual Disability Discuss Their Lived Experiences of a Structured Social Group

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References (33)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd
ISSN
1360-2322
eISSN
1468-3148
DOI
10.1111/jar.12275
pmid
27554436
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

IntroductionBetter understanding the effects of social exclusion on adults with intellectual disability is a high priority for the community in terms of the social, health and economic costs that result as a consequence of social exclusion. Social exclusion, loneliness and a lack of friends present many people with intellectual disability with a health and well‐being triple jeopardy (McVilly et al. ). Social inclusion can be described as not only being present in a community, but also having meaningful social connections and participating in fulfilling social activities (Cummins & Lau ; Hall ; Overmars‐Marx et al. ). Participation in meaningful social activities has been demonstrated to have a significant positive impact on loneliness for people with intellectual disability (e.g. Stancliffe et al. ; Wilson et al. ). Yet, many people with intellectual disability remain socially isolated, and hence lonely, as they require support to access social opportunities and face added physical barriers. One major barrier for people with intellectual disability to regularly access and socialize with friends has been noted to be a lack of travel skills (Department of Health, ). Although the association is not clear, Gilmore & Cuskelly () suggested that the ramifications of loneliness and social exclusion could potentially contribute to

Journal

Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual DisabilitiesWiley

Published: Sep 1, 2017

Keywords: ; ; ; ; ;

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