From ‘Dutiful Daughters’ to ‘Coeds Ruining the Nation’: Reception of Simone de Beauvoir's The Second Sex in Early Postwar Japan

From ‘Dutiful Daughters’ to ‘Coeds Ruining the Nation’: Reception of Simone de Beauvoir's... In the wake of the Second World War, there was a dramatic resurgence of feminist activity in Japan as Occupation forces sought allies among the Japanese in their project to remake the nation as a peaceful and democratic bulwark against communism. As the Occupiers saw it, empowering Japanese women would help ‘civilise’ the nation and rein in its ‘feudalistic’ impulses toward militarism, so support for women's rights became central to this wholesale restructuring of the nation's legal, economic and social framework. But even as Japanese women gained the right to vote, run for office, choose their spouses, inherit property and initiate divorce on a par with men, both men and women were forced to grapple with the wide gap between the new democratic ideals and persistently conventional expectations of women's roles. As the Occupation drew to a close and conservative Japanese politicians began to reassert control over the course of their nation's recovery and development, heated debates transpired regarding which of these democratic reforms would remain in place, and which would be abandoned in favour of a return to ‘tradition’.Conservatives viewed the introduction of coeducation, which was included as part of Occupation‐era reforms in an attempt to ensure ‘equality http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Gender & History Wiley

From ‘Dutiful Daughters’ to ‘Coeds Ruining the Nation’: Reception of Simone de Beauvoir's The Second Sex in Early Postwar Japan

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/from-dutiful-daughters-to-coeds-ruining-the-nation-reception-of-simone-0jUAkp147a
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd
ISSN
0953-5233
eISSN
1468-0424
D.O.I.
10.1111/1468-0424.12341
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In the wake of the Second World War, there was a dramatic resurgence of feminist activity in Japan as Occupation forces sought allies among the Japanese in their project to remake the nation as a peaceful and democratic bulwark against communism. As the Occupiers saw it, empowering Japanese women would help ‘civilise’ the nation and rein in its ‘feudalistic’ impulses toward militarism, so support for women's rights became central to this wholesale restructuring of the nation's legal, economic and social framework. But even as Japanese women gained the right to vote, run for office, choose their spouses, inherit property and initiate divorce on a par with men, both men and women were forced to grapple with the wide gap between the new democratic ideals and persistently conventional expectations of women's roles. As the Occupation drew to a close and conservative Japanese politicians began to reassert control over the course of their nation's recovery and development, heated debates transpired regarding which of these democratic reforms would remain in place, and which would be abandoned in favour of a return to ‘tradition’.Conservatives viewed the introduction of coeducation, which was included as part of Occupation‐era reforms in an attempt to ensure ‘equality

Journal

Gender & HistoryWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off