Framing Sustainability

Framing Sustainability In June of 1858 Abraham Lincoln began his address at Springfield, Illinois, by saying “If we could first know where we are, and whither we are tending, we could then better judge what to do and how to do it.” He spoke on the issue of slavery that day with a directness that other politicians were loath to practice. At Springfield he asserted that “A house divided against itself cannot stand … this government cannot endure, permanently half slave and half free.” His immediate targets were the evasions and complications of the Kansas–Nebraska Act of 1854 and the Supreme Court ruling handed down in the Dred Scott decision as well as those whom he accused of conspiring to spread slavery to states where it did not already exist. In his speech Lincoln accused Senator Stephen Douglas, President Franklin Pierce, Supreme Court Justice Roger Taney, and President James Buchanan of a conspiracy to spread slavery supported by circumstantial evidence such that it was “impossible to not believe that Stephen and Franklin and Roger and James all understood one another from the beginning, and all worked upon a common plan or draft drawn up before the first lick was struck.” http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Conservation Biology Wiley

Framing Sustainability

Conservation Biology, Volume 20 (2) – Apr 1, 2006

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0888-8892
eISSN
1523-1739
DOI
10.1111/j.1523-1739.2006.00405.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In June of 1858 Abraham Lincoln began his address at Springfield, Illinois, by saying “If we could first know where we are, and whither we are tending, we could then better judge what to do and how to do it.” He spoke on the issue of slavery that day with a directness that other politicians were loath to practice. At Springfield he asserted that “A house divided against itself cannot stand … this government cannot endure, permanently half slave and half free.” His immediate targets were the evasions and complications of the Kansas–Nebraska Act of 1854 and the Supreme Court ruling handed down in the Dred Scott decision as well as those whom he accused of conspiring to spread slavery to states where it did not already exist. In his speech Lincoln accused Senator Stephen Douglas, President Franklin Pierce, Supreme Court Justice Roger Taney, and President James Buchanan of a conspiracy to spread slavery supported by circumstantial evidence such that it was “impossible to not believe that Stephen and Franklin and Roger and James all understood one another from the beginning, and all worked upon a common plan or draft drawn up before the first lick was struck.”

Journal

Conservation BiologyWiley

Published: Apr 1, 2006

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