Frame Rate vs Resolution: A Subjective Evaluation of Spatiotemporal Perceived Quality Under Varying Computational Budgets

Frame Rate vs Resolution: A Subjective Evaluation of Spatiotemporal Perceived Quality Under... Maximizing performance for rendered content requires making compromises on quality parameters depending on the computational resources available . Yet, it is currently unclear which parameters best maximize perceived quality. This work investigates perceived quality across computational budgets for the primary spatiotemporal parameters of resolution and frame rate. Three experiments are conducted. Experiment 1 (n = 26) shows that participants prefer fixed frame rates of 60 frames per second (fps) at lower resolutions over 30 fps at higher resolutions. Experiment 2 (n = 24) explores the relationship further with more budgets and quality settings and again finds 60 fps is generally preferred even when more resources are available. Experiment 3 (n = 25) permits the use of adaptive frame rates, and analyses the resource allocation across seven budgets. Results show that while participants allocate more resources to frame rate at lower budgets the situation reverses once higher budgets are available and a frame rate of around 40 fps is achieved. In the overall, the results demonstrate a complex relationship between frame rate and resolution's effects on perceived quality. This relationship can be harnessed, via the results and models presented, to obtain more cost‐effective virtual experiences. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Computer Graphics Forum Wiley

Frame Rate vs Resolution: A Subjective Evaluation of Spatiotemporal Perceived Quality Under Varying Computational Budgets

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/frame-rate-vs-resolution-a-subjective-evaluation-of-spatiotemporal-a4NC5LS0Sr
Publisher
Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
Copyright
© 2018 The Eurographics Association and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
ISSN
0167-7055
eISSN
1467-8659
D.O.I.
10.1111/cgf.13302
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Maximizing performance for rendered content requires making compromises on quality parameters depending on the computational resources available . Yet, it is currently unclear which parameters best maximize perceived quality. This work investigates perceived quality across computational budgets for the primary spatiotemporal parameters of resolution and frame rate. Three experiments are conducted. Experiment 1 (n = 26) shows that participants prefer fixed frame rates of 60 frames per second (fps) at lower resolutions over 30 fps at higher resolutions. Experiment 2 (n = 24) explores the relationship further with more budgets and quality settings and again finds 60 fps is generally preferred even when more resources are available. Experiment 3 (n = 25) permits the use of adaptive frame rates, and analyses the resource allocation across seven budgets. Results show that while participants allocate more resources to frame rate at lower budgets the situation reverses once higher budgets are available and a frame rate of around 40 fps is achieved. In the overall, the results demonstrate a complex relationship between frame rate and resolution's effects on perceived quality. This relationship can be harnessed, via the results and models presented, to obtain more cost‐effective virtual experiences.

Journal

Computer Graphics ForumWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

Keywords: ; ; ;

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off