Fractal aggregates in geophysics

Fractal aggregates in geophysics The combination of small particles to form larger structures is important in a broad range of natural processes, including the flocculation of organic and mineral particles in rivers, estuaries, and the open sea, the growth of smoke particles in the atmosphere, and accretion in the primordial solar nebula. Very often, these structures (cluster, flocs, and aggregates) have a low‐density random structure that can be described quite well in terms of the concepts of fractal geometry. The structure, growth kinetics, and properties of these “fractal aggregates” have been of considerable interest in statistical physics for the past decade. Other processes such as fluid‐fluid displacement in a porous medium, the dissolution of porous materials, dielectric breakdown, and random dendritic growth also lead to the growth of random fractals and can be understood in terms of aggregation models such as diffusion‐limited aggregation. The characterization of fractal aggregates produced by computer simulations, laboratory experiments, and natural processes is described, and some of the implications of the aggregates' fractal structure are discussed. The role played by fractal aggregates in geophysical processes such as sedimentation, air and water pollution, the evolution of river networks, and multiphase flow in porous materials is also discussed. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Reviews of Geophysics Wiley

Fractal aggregates in geophysics

Reviews of Geophysics, Volume 29 (3) – Aug 1, 1991

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1991 by the American Geophysical Union.
ISSN
8755-1209
eISSN
1944-9208
DOI
10.1029/91RG00688
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The combination of small particles to form larger structures is important in a broad range of natural processes, including the flocculation of organic and mineral particles in rivers, estuaries, and the open sea, the growth of smoke particles in the atmosphere, and accretion in the primordial solar nebula. Very often, these structures (cluster, flocs, and aggregates) have a low‐density random structure that can be described quite well in terms of the concepts of fractal geometry. The structure, growth kinetics, and properties of these “fractal aggregates” have been of considerable interest in statistical physics for the past decade. Other processes such as fluid‐fluid displacement in a porous medium, the dissolution of porous materials, dielectric breakdown, and random dendritic growth also lead to the growth of random fractals and can be understood in terms of aggregation models such as diffusion‐limited aggregation. The characterization of fractal aggregates produced by computer simulations, laboratory experiments, and natural processes is described, and some of the implications of the aggregates' fractal structure are discussed. The role played by fractal aggregates in geophysical processes such as sedimentation, air and water pollution, the evolution of river networks, and multiphase flow in porous materials is also discussed.

Journal

Reviews of GeophysicsWiley

Published: Aug 1, 1991

References

  • Optical properties of ultrafine gold particles
    Granqvist, Granqvist; Hunderi, Hunderi
  • Soil piping and stream channel initiation
    Jones, Jones
  • Potential for increased nutrient uptake by flocculating diatoms
    Logan, Logan; Alldredge, Alldredge
  • Model for colloidal aggregation
    Meakin, Meakin
  • The effects of restructuring on the geometry of clusters formed by diffusion‐limited, ballistic and reaction‐limited cluster‐cluster aggregation
    Meakin, Meakin; Jullien, Jullien
  • The effects of attractive and repulsive interactions on two‐dimensional reaction‐limited aggregation
    Meakin, Meakin; Muthukumar, Muthukumar
  • Morphological stability of a particle growing by diffusion or heat flow
    Mullins, Mullins; Sekerka, Sekerka
  • The fractal nature of river networks
    Tarboton, Tarboton; Bras, Bras; Rodriquez‐Iturbe, Rodriquez‐Iturbe

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