Forest Fragmentation, Artificial Nest Studies, and Predator Abundance

Forest Fragmentation, Artificial Nest Studies, and Predator Abundance Paper submitted November 10, 1995; revised manuscript accepted November 28, 1995. ground-nesting birds (see Redmond et al. 1982; Yahner et al. 1993). I strongly urge investigators w h o use artificial nests to take their study design one step further by documenting the dynamics of predator abundance in a given managed, forested landscape (see also Bowman & Harris 1980; Picman 1988; Yahner & MorreU 1991). Haskell (p. 1318) and others (Andr6n 1992, Yahner & Scott 1988) have shown that large mammals or corvids often are the principal predators of artificial nests in managed forested landscapes. However, because artificial nest studies tend to be short-term, any change in abundance of nest predators may not only go undetected from one year to the next but could result in different observed predation rates. Then depending on the year of a given artificial nest study, investigators might derive a different conclusion regarding the impact of forest fragmentation on avian nesting success. A case in point is a comparison of two artificial nest studies conducted subsequent to consecutive cutting cycles at the Barrens Grouse Habitat Management Area (HMA) in central Pennsylvania: In both studies, American Crows (Corvus brachyrhynchos) and Blue Jays (Cyanocitta cristata) http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Conservation Biology Wiley

Forest Fragmentation, Artificial Nest Studies, and Predator Abundance

Conservation Biology, Volume 10 (2) – Apr 1, 1996

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1996 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0888-8892
eISSN
1523-1739
DOI
10.1046/j.1523-1739.1996.10020672.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Paper submitted November 10, 1995; revised manuscript accepted November 28, 1995. ground-nesting birds (see Redmond et al. 1982; Yahner et al. 1993). I strongly urge investigators w h o use artificial nests to take their study design one step further by documenting the dynamics of predator abundance in a given managed, forested landscape (see also Bowman & Harris 1980; Picman 1988; Yahner & MorreU 1991). Haskell (p. 1318) and others (Andr6n 1992, Yahner & Scott 1988) have shown that large mammals or corvids often are the principal predators of artificial nests in managed forested landscapes. However, because artificial nest studies tend to be short-term, any change in abundance of nest predators may not only go undetected from one year to the next but could result in different observed predation rates. Then depending on the year of a given artificial nest study, investigators might derive a different conclusion regarding the impact of forest fragmentation on avian nesting success. A case in point is a comparison of two artificial nest studies conducted subsequent to consecutive cutting cycles at the Barrens Grouse Habitat Management Area (HMA) in central Pennsylvania: In both studies, American Crows (Corvus brachyrhynchos) and Blue Jays (Cyanocitta cristata)

Journal

Conservation BiologyWiley

Published: Apr 1, 1996

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