Fluvial network topology shapes communities of native and non‐native amphipods

Fluvial network topology shapes communities of native and non‐native amphipods Habitat connectivity crucially influences dispersal of organisms. It is especially seen as an important driver of the spatial structuring of biological communities in ecosystems that have intrinsic and general connectivity patterns, such as the universal dendritic structure of fluvial networks. These networks not only define dispersal of native species, but also represent corridors of biological invasions, making understanding network topology effects on invasion dynamics and subsequent diversity patterns of high interest. We studied amphipod community diversity and structure in the upper 27,882‐km2 drainage basin of the river Rhine in Central Europe, focusing on differences between native and non‐native species. Overall, species richness increased along the network from headwaters to the outlet nodes. We found, however, contrasting patterns of native and non‐native amphipod richness along the network, with headwater nodes representing refugia for native species and more downstream nodes being hotspots of biological invasions. Importantly, while species turnover (β‐diversity) of native species increased with distance between nodes in the network, this was not the case for non‐native species, indicating a much lower dispersal limitation of the latter. Finally, the overall amphipod community structure closely mirrored the topological modularity of the network, highlighting the network's imprint on community structure. Our results underpin the importance of connectivity for community formation and the significance of rivers for biological invasions and suggest that empirically observed matches of diversity patterns in rivers predicted by null models are the long‐term outcome of species invasions and species sorting. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ecosphere Wiley

Fluvial network topology shapes communities of native and non‐native amphipods

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/fluvial-network-topology-shapes-communities-of-native-and-non-native-FluCiJBBgK
Publisher
Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
Copyright
© 2018 The Ecological Society of America
ISSN
2150-8925
eISSN
2150-8925
D.O.I.
10.1002/ecs2.2102
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Habitat connectivity crucially influences dispersal of organisms. It is especially seen as an important driver of the spatial structuring of biological communities in ecosystems that have intrinsic and general connectivity patterns, such as the universal dendritic structure of fluvial networks. These networks not only define dispersal of native species, but also represent corridors of biological invasions, making understanding network topology effects on invasion dynamics and subsequent diversity patterns of high interest. We studied amphipod community diversity and structure in the upper 27,882‐km2 drainage basin of the river Rhine in Central Europe, focusing on differences between native and non‐native species. Overall, species richness increased along the network from headwaters to the outlet nodes. We found, however, contrasting patterns of native and non‐native amphipod richness along the network, with headwater nodes representing refugia for native species and more downstream nodes being hotspots of biological invasions. Importantly, while species turnover (β‐diversity) of native species increased with distance between nodes in the network, this was not the case for non‐native species, indicating a much lower dispersal limitation of the latter. Finally, the overall amphipod community structure closely mirrored the topological modularity of the network, highlighting the network's imprint on community structure. Our results underpin the importance of connectivity for community formation and the significance of rivers for biological invasions and suggest that empirically observed matches of diversity patterns in rivers predicted by null models are the long‐term outcome of species invasions and species sorting.

Journal

EcosphereWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

Keywords: ; ; ; ;

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 12 million articles from more than
10,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Unlimited reading

Read as many articles as you need. Full articles with original layout, charts and figures. Read online, from anywhere.

Stay up to date

Keep up with your field with Personalized Recommendations and Follow Journals to get automatic updates.

Organize your research

It’s easy to organize your research with our built-in tools.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

Monthly Plan

  • Read unlimited articles
  • Personalized recommendations
  • No expiration
  • Print 20 pages per month
  • 20% off on PDF purchases
  • Organize your research
  • Get updates on your journals and topic searches

$49/month

Start Free Trial

14-day Free Trial

Best Deal — 39% off

Annual Plan

  • All the features of the Professional Plan, but for 39% off!
  • Billed annually
  • No expiration
  • For the normal price of 10 articles elsewhere, you get one full year of unlimited access to articles.

$588

$360/year

billed annually
Start Free Trial

14-day Free Trial