Flow cytometric fingerprinting for microbial strain discrimination and physiological characterization

Flow cytometric fingerprinting for microbial strain discrimination and physiological... The analysis of microbial populations is fundamental, not only for developing a deeper understanding of microbial communities but also for their engineering in biotechnological applications. Many methods have been developed to study their characteristics and over the last few decades, molecular analysis tools, such as DNA sequencing, have been used with considerable success to identify the composition of microbial populations. Recently, flow cytometric fingerprinting is emerging as a promising and powerful method to analyze bacterial populations. So far, these methods have primarily been used to observe shifts in the composition of microbial communities of natural samples. In this article, we apply a flow cytometric fingerprinting method to discriminate among 29 Lactobacillus strains. Our results indicate that it is possible to discriminate among 27 Lactobacillus strains by staining with SYBR green I and that the discriminatory power can be increased by combined SYBR green I and propidium iodide staining. Furthermore, we illustrate the impact of physiological changes on the fingerprinting method by demonstrating how flow cytometric fingerprinting is able to discriminate the different growth phases of a microbial culture. The sensitivity of the method is assessed by its ability to detect changes in the relative abundance of a mix of polystyrene beads down to 1.2%. When a mix of bacteria was used, the sensitivity was as between 1.2% and 5%. The presented data demonstrate that flow cytometric fingerprinting is a sensitive and reproducible technique with the potential to be applied as a method for the dereplication of bacterial isolates. © 2017 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Cytometry Wiley

Flow cytometric fingerprinting for microbial strain discrimination and physiological characterization

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 2018 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry
ISSN
1552-4922
eISSN
1552-4930
D.O.I.
10.1002/cyto.a.23302
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The analysis of microbial populations is fundamental, not only for developing a deeper understanding of microbial communities but also for their engineering in biotechnological applications. Many methods have been developed to study their characteristics and over the last few decades, molecular analysis tools, such as DNA sequencing, have been used with considerable success to identify the composition of microbial populations. Recently, flow cytometric fingerprinting is emerging as a promising and powerful method to analyze bacterial populations. So far, these methods have primarily been used to observe shifts in the composition of microbial communities of natural samples. In this article, we apply a flow cytometric fingerprinting method to discriminate among 29 Lactobacillus strains. Our results indicate that it is possible to discriminate among 27 Lactobacillus strains by staining with SYBR green I and that the discriminatory power can be increased by combined SYBR green I and propidium iodide staining. Furthermore, we illustrate the impact of physiological changes on the fingerprinting method by demonstrating how flow cytometric fingerprinting is able to discriminate the different growth phases of a microbial culture. The sensitivity of the method is assessed by its ability to detect changes in the relative abundance of a mix of polystyrene beads down to 1.2%. When a mix of bacteria was used, the sensitivity was as between 1.2% and 5%. The presented data demonstrate that flow cytometric fingerprinting is a sensitive and reproducible technique with the potential to be applied as a method for the dereplication of bacterial isolates. © 2017 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry

Journal

CytometryWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

Keywords: ; ; ; ;

References

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