Flow channeling in heterogeneous fractured rocks

Flow channeling in heterogeneous fractured rocks Experimental observations and theoretical studies over the last 10 years or so have demonstrated that flow channeling or preferred flow paths is a common phenomenon in fractured rocks. The reason it has come to the forefront of scientific investigation is the recent interest in predicting solute transport in geological media as part of safety assessment of geologic isolation of nuclear or toxic wastes. Solute transport is much more sensitive to medium heterogeneity than is temperature or pressure. In this paper, experimental observations of tracer transport over distances ranging from centimeters to hundreds of meters are reviewed, and theoretical efforts to explain or model these observations are summarized. Processes that may explain some of the experimental observations without the use of flow‐channeling models are discussed. The paper concludes with a discussion of the implications of flow channeling on the practical problems related to contaminant transport in geologic systems. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Reviews of Geophysics Wiley

Flow channeling in heterogeneous fractured rocks

Reviews of Geophysics, Volume 36 (2) – May 1, 1998

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1998 by the American Geophysical Union.
ISSN
8755-1209
eISSN
1944-9208
D.O.I.
10.1029/97RG03319
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Experimental observations and theoretical studies over the last 10 years or so have demonstrated that flow channeling or preferred flow paths is a common phenomenon in fractured rocks. The reason it has come to the forefront of scientific investigation is the recent interest in predicting solute transport in geological media as part of safety assessment of geologic isolation of nuclear or toxic wastes. Solute transport is much more sensitive to medium heterogeneity than is temperature or pressure. In this paper, experimental observations of tracer transport over distances ranging from centimeters to hundreds of meters are reviewed, and theoretical efforts to explain or model these observations are summarized. Processes that may explain some of the experimental observations without the use of flow‐channeling models are discussed. The paper concludes with a discussion of the implications of flow channeling on the practical problems related to contaminant transport in geologic systems.

Journal

Reviews of GeophysicsWiley

Published: May 1, 1998

References

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