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Flexible production systems and regional development: the rise of new industrial spaces in North America and western Europe *

Flexible production systems and regional development: the rise of new industrial spaces in North... in particular, to elucidate the locational meaning of certain deeply rooted changes that are currently occurring in the industrial systems of North America and western Europe. These changes consist primarily in a relative decline in the importance of Fordist mass production and an enormous expansion of manufacturing activities based on less rigid and more highly adaptable (i.e., flexible) technological and institutional structures. The same changes are associated with and embedded in a set of wider shifts in what theorists of the French Regulationist School have termed the regime of capitalist uccumulutiott , (cf. Aglietta, 1976; Boyer, 1986a and Lipietz, 1986). We might say, in brief, that the old hegemonic regime of Fordist accumulation has progressively been giving way to a new regime of flexible accrirnulution. With the steady ascendance of the latter regime, a number of new industrial spaces have also started to make their decisive historical appearance on the economic landscape, and these now call urgently for analytical attention. As it happens, the current situation is one of considerable complexity, for the old regime is far from having disappeared entirely, and the new one by no means as yet universally regnant. Moreover, the geographical outcomes proper to http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Urban and Regional Research Wiley

Flexible production systems and regional development: the rise of new industrial spaces in North America and western Europe *

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References (16)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
1988 Joint Editors and Blackwell Publishing Ltd
ISSN
0309-1317
eISSN
1468-2427
DOI
10.1111/j.1468-2427.1988.tb00448.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

in particular, to elucidate the locational meaning of certain deeply rooted changes that are currently occurring in the industrial systems of North America and western Europe. These changes consist primarily in a relative decline in the importance of Fordist mass production and an enormous expansion of manufacturing activities based on less rigid and more highly adaptable (i.e., flexible) technological and institutional structures. The same changes are associated with and embedded in a set of wider shifts in what theorists of the French Regulationist School have termed the regime of capitalist uccumulutiott , (cf. Aglietta, 1976; Boyer, 1986a and Lipietz, 1986). We might say, in brief, that the old hegemonic regime of Fordist accumulation has progressively been giving way to a new regime of flexible accrirnulution. With the steady ascendance of the latter regime, a number of new industrial spaces have also started to make their decisive historical appearance on the economic landscape, and these now call urgently for analytical attention. As it happens, the current situation is one of considerable complexity, for the old regime is far from having disappeared entirely, and the new one by no means as yet universally regnant. Moreover, the geographical outcomes proper to

Journal

International Journal of Urban and Regional ResearchWiley

Published: Jun 1, 1988

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