Fish subchronic toxicity prediction model for industrial organic chemicals that produce narcosis

Fish subchronic toxicity prediction model for industrial organic chemicals that produce narcosis A model based on partition coefficient was developed for predicting subchronic toxicities of selected chemicals to fish. Early life stage tests were conducted under flow‐through conditions using fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) as test organisms. Embryos, larvae and juveniles were continuously exposed to chemicals for a total of 31 to 33 d. Test endpoints included egg hatchability, incidence of developmental abnormalities, survival and growth. The “chronic value” for each test was a point estimate of the maximum acceptable toxicant concentration (MATC), and was determined as the geometric mean of the highest test concentration producing no effect and the lowest concentration significantly (p ≤ 0.05) affecting one or more endpoints. Ten industrial organic compounds from four chemical classes (ketones, benzenes, ethers and alkyl halides) were used in model development. All chemicals were considered to induce narcosis in fish in acute toxicity tests. The relationship between estimated MATC n‐octanol/water partition coefficient (log P) was expressed by the equation http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry Wiley

Fish subchronic toxicity prediction model for industrial organic chemicals that produce narcosis

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/fish-subchronic-toxicity-prediction-model-for-industrial-organic-KefsSBNAnw
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1985 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0730-7268
eISSN
1552-8618
DOI
10.1002/etc.5620040308
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A model based on partition coefficient was developed for predicting subchronic toxicities of selected chemicals to fish. Early life stage tests were conducted under flow‐through conditions using fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) as test organisms. Embryos, larvae and juveniles were continuously exposed to chemicals for a total of 31 to 33 d. Test endpoints included egg hatchability, incidence of developmental abnormalities, survival and growth. The “chronic value” for each test was a point estimate of the maximum acceptable toxicant concentration (MATC), and was determined as the geometric mean of the highest test concentration producing no effect and the lowest concentration significantly (p ≤ 0.05) affecting one or more endpoints. Ten industrial organic compounds from four chemical classes (ketones, benzenes, ethers and alkyl halides) were used in model development. All chemicals were considered to induce narcosis in fish in acute toxicity tests. The relationship between estimated MATC n‐octanol/water partition coefficient (log P) was expressed by the equation

Journal

Environmental Toxicology & ChemistryWiley

Published: Jun 1, 1985

Keywords: ; ; ; ;

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off