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Fish monitors and the role of electric fish as potential indicators of water quality

Fish monitors and the role of electric fish as potential indicators of water quality Summary At a time when environmental pollution is a major issue the need for suitable monitoring systems has become paramount. There are in existence a number of methods for determining pollution levels in surface waters, however they often lack in specificity. Biological systems, therefore, are often deemed most suitable. Many organisms may be used as biosensors but studies incorporating fish have been most prevalent to monitor ventilatory response, activity levels, avoidance or rheotactic behaviour. More recently, work has concentrated on the use of the weakly electric fish, Gnathonemus, (family Mormyridae), which is characterised by the possession of electric organs near the tail. The fish use these electric organs to generate and transmit small electrical impulses, less than IV, into the surrounding water to communicate and navigate. Changes in the rate of pulsing can be used to identify the presence of certain chemicals in the water source. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Applied Ichthyology Wiley

Fish monitors and the role of electric fish as potential indicators of water quality

Journal of Applied Ichthyology , Volume 9 (2) – Jun 1, 1993

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1993 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0175-8659
eISSN
1439-0426
DOI
10.1111/j.1439-0426.1993.tb00532.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Summary At a time when environmental pollution is a major issue the need for suitable monitoring systems has become paramount. There are in existence a number of methods for determining pollution levels in surface waters, however they often lack in specificity. Biological systems, therefore, are often deemed most suitable. Many organisms may be used as biosensors but studies incorporating fish have been most prevalent to monitor ventilatory response, activity levels, avoidance or rheotactic behaviour. More recently, work has concentrated on the use of the weakly electric fish, Gnathonemus, (family Mormyridae), which is characterised by the possession of electric organs near the tail. The fish use these electric organs to generate and transmit small electrical impulses, less than IV, into the surrounding water to communicate and navigate. Changes in the rate of pulsing can be used to identify the presence of certain chemicals in the water source.

Journal

Journal of Applied IchthyologyWiley

Published: Jun 1, 1993

References