Finite Element Analysis as a Method to Study Molluscan Shell Mechanics

Finite Element Analysis as a Method to Study Molluscan Shell Mechanics IntroductionMolluscs are a remarkable group of lophotrochozoans who have evolved the ability to take a single mineral − calcium carbonate − and build a morphologically complex, hierarchical shell whose strength and toughness far exceed its constituent components. Understanding the mechanics of the shell is paramount to understanding its function, which further provides insight into the animals ecology and evolutionary history as well as providing us with inspiration for man‐made materials. Measuring mechanical properties and the connection between those properties and their function and then from function to ecology requires data from numerous analytical techniques; however, some of the data required is beyond the ability of laboratory experiments to provide. An example of this comes from the external shells of cephalopods. These shells are filled with gas and have to resist hydrostatic pressure; the ability of different shell morphologies to resist increasing hydrostatic pressure would require information about the stress and strain fields within the shell. Measuring these internal stresses and strains within the shell under high hydrostatic pressure is however, unfeasible experimentally. How then can this problem be approached? The answer comes from the field of computational mechanics, specifically finite element analysis (FEA). FEA can take a digital representation http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Advanced Engineering Materials Wiley

Finite Element Analysis as a Method to Study Molluscan Shell Mechanics

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/finite-element-analysis-as-a-method-to-study-molluscan-shell-mechanics-aLAlTSLGni
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim
ISSN
1438-1656
eISSN
1527-2648
D.O.I.
10.1002/adem.201700939
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

IntroductionMolluscs are a remarkable group of lophotrochozoans who have evolved the ability to take a single mineral − calcium carbonate − and build a morphologically complex, hierarchical shell whose strength and toughness far exceed its constituent components. Understanding the mechanics of the shell is paramount to understanding its function, which further provides insight into the animals ecology and evolutionary history as well as providing us with inspiration for man‐made materials. Measuring mechanical properties and the connection between those properties and their function and then from function to ecology requires data from numerous analytical techniques; however, some of the data required is beyond the ability of laboratory experiments to provide. An example of this comes from the external shells of cephalopods. These shells are filled with gas and have to resist hydrostatic pressure; the ability of different shell morphologies to resist increasing hydrostatic pressure would require information about the stress and strain fields within the shell. Measuring these internal stresses and strains within the shell under high hydrostatic pressure is however, unfeasible experimentally. How then can this problem be approached? The answer comes from the field of computational mechanics, specifically finite element analysis (FEA). FEA can take a digital representation

Journal

Advanced Engineering MaterialsWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

Keywords: ; ; ; ; ;

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off