Ficoll‐hypaque separation vs whole blood lysis: Comparison of efficiency and impact on minimal residual disease analysis

Ficoll‐hypaque separation vs whole blood lysis: Comparison of efficiency and impact on minimal... INTRODUCTIONThe studies of the latest years highlighted how molecular biology laboratory practice changed from single to high‐throughput analysis, accompanied by an increase in the number of samples tested simultaneously.In the high‐throughput era, also the pre‐analytical phase requires the automation of the experiment setting and especially the methodology of nucleic acid extraction. Nevertheless, the current biobanking procedures and cell recovery are still labor‐intensive, requiring long time and dedicated laboratory staff.In many hematological clinical trials, as well as in the clinical practice of selected centers, bone marrow (BM) and peripheral blood (PB) samples are being collected and analyzed at diagnosis and during the treatment phases for minimal residual disease (MRD) and mutational studies. MRD analysis by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has been shown to be a powerful early predictor of therapy response and outcome in lymphoproliferative disorders, such as acute lymphoblastic leukemia, follicular lymphoma (FL), mantle cell lymphoma (MCL), and multiple myeloma (MM).In previous published studies, MRD analysis was commonly performed on genomic DNA (gDNA) from BM or PB mononuclear cells (MNCs) collected using density gradient separation approach. Since the 80s, Ficoll, a sucrose polymer with high molecular weight (1077 g/mL), has been recommended to collect MNCs. This is a feasible procedure, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Laboratory Hematology Wiley

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Publisher
Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd
ISSN
1751-5521
eISSN
1751-553X
D.O.I.
10.1111/ijlh.12766
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

INTRODUCTIONThe studies of the latest years highlighted how molecular biology laboratory practice changed from single to high‐throughput analysis, accompanied by an increase in the number of samples tested simultaneously.In the high‐throughput era, also the pre‐analytical phase requires the automation of the experiment setting and especially the methodology of nucleic acid extraction. Nevertheless, the current biobanking procedures and cell recovery are still labor‐intensive, requiring long time and dedicated laboratory staff.In many hematological clinical trials, as well as in the clinical practice of selected centers, bone marrow (BM) and peripheral blood (PB) samples are being collected and analyzed at diagnosis and during the treatment phases for minimal residual disease (MRD) and mutational studies. MRD analysis by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has been shown to be a powerful early predictor of therapy response and outcome in lymphoproliferative disorders, such as acute lymphoblastic leukemia, follicular lymphoma (FL), mantle cell lymphoma (MCL), and multiple myeloma (MM).In previous published studies, MRD analysis was commonly performed on genomic DNA (gDNA) from BM or PB mononuclear cells (MNCs) collected using density gradient separation approach. Since the 80s, Ficoll, a sucrose polymer with high molecular weight (1077 g/mL), has been recommended to collect MNCs. This is a feasible procedure,

Journal

International Journal of Laboratory HematologyWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

Keywords: ; ; ;

References

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