Fertility treatment: Getting stressed about stress

Fertility treatment: Getting stressed about stress Fertility treatment is stress‐generating. Couples experiencing such stress are further concerned with the possibility that stress, in itself, may compromise the chance of treatment success. An internet search using the terms ‘fertility’ and ‘stress’ retrieves countless hits supporting the concept of stress adversely affecting fertility.In this issue, Cesta and colleagues report a prospective observational study investigating the effect of stress on the success of IVF. The study quantified stress by women's self‐reported stress levels, which was a subjective measure; supplemented by the measurement of salivary cortisol levels, which was an objective measure of stress. The authors assembled a prospective cohort (n = 485) starting fertility treatment. Female participants were given two varieties of questionnaires to estimate self‐reported stress. There was no group not undergoing fertility treatment, so it is not possible to estimate the extent of increase in the stress related to fertility treatment from this study. However, the authors compared the success (embryo quality and clinical pregnancy rate) in subgroups of their cohort. There was a significant correlation between the scores obtained by the two questionnaires, but interestingly, the scores did not correlate with salivary cortisol levels. None of the stress measures correlated with success, regardless of the way success http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Acta Obstetricia Et Gynecologica Scandinavica Wiley

Fertility treatment: Getting stressed about stress

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/fertility-treatment-getting-stressed-about-stress-mlO8R6M8Cv
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica
ISSN
0001-6349
eISSN
1600-0412
D.O.I.
10.1111/aogs.13302
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Fertility treatment is stress‐generating. Couples experiencing such stress are further concerned with the possibility that stress, in itself, may compromise the chance of treatment success. An internet search using the terms ‘fertility’ and ‘stress’ retrieves countless hits supporting the concept of stress adversely affecting fertility.In this issue, Cesta and colleagues report a prospective observational study investigating the effect of stress on the success of IVF. The study quantified stress by women's self‐reported stress levels, which was a subjective measure; supplemented by the measurement of salivary cortisol levels, which was an objective measure of stress. The authors assembled a prospective cohort (n = 485) starting fertility treatment. Female participants were given two varieties of questionnaires to estimate self‐reported stress. There was no group not undergoing fertility treatment, so it is not possible to estimate the extent of increase in the stress related to fertility treatment from this study. However, the authors compared the success (embryo quality and clinical pregnancy rate) in subgroups of their cohort. There was a significant correlation between the scores obtained by the two questionnaires, but interestingly, the scores did not correlate with salivary cortisol levels. None of the stress measures correlated with success, regardless of the way success

Journal

Acta Obstetricia Et Gynecologica ScandinavicaWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off