Fertility Preferences and Cognition: Religiosity and Experimental Effects of Decision Context on College Women

Fertility Preferences and Cognition: Religiosity and Experimental Effects of Decision Context on... Better models of culture and cognition may help researchers understand fertility and family formation. The authors examine cognition about fertility using an experimental survey design to investigate how fertility preferences of college women are affected by two prompts that bring to mind fertility‐relevant factors: career aspirations and financial limitations. The authors test the effects of these prompts on fertility preferences and ask how effects vary with respondent religiosity, an aspect of social identity related to fertility preferences. The authors find significant effects of treatment on fertility preferences when accounting for religiosity: Less religious women who considered their career aspirations or financial limitations reported smaller desired family size, but this effect was attenuated for more religious women. This study demonstrates how fertility preferences are shaped by decision contexts for some sociodemographic groups. The authors discuss how the findings support a social–cognitive model of fertility. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Marriage and Family Wiley

Fertility Preferences and Cognition: Religiosity and Experimental Effects of Decision Context on College Women

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Publisher
Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
Copyright
Copyright © National Council on Family Relations, 2018
ISSN
0022-2445
eISSN
1741-3737
D.O.I.
10.1111/jomf.12449
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Better models of culture and cognition may help researchers understand fertility and family formation. The authors examine cognition about fertility using an experimental survey design to investigate how fertility preferences of college women are affected by two prompts that bring to mind fertility‐relevant factors: career aspirations and financial limitations. The authors test the effects of these prompts on fertility preferences and ask how effects vary with respondent religiosity, an aspect of social identity related to fertility preferences. The authors find significant effects of treatment on fertility preferences when accounting for religiosity: Less religious women who considered their career aspirations or financial limitations reported smaller desired family size, but this effect was attenuated for more religious women. This study demonstrates how fertility preferences are shaped by decision contexts for some sociodemographic groups. The authors discuss how the findings support a social–cognitive model of fertility.

Journal

Journal of Marriage and FamilyWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

Keywords: ; ; ; ; ;

References

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