Family of origin characteristics as predictors of perfectionism

Family of origin characteristics as predictors of perfectionism This study investigated perceptions of family of origin (parental style and family system characteristics) as predictors of dysfunctional and functional perfectionism (as measured by the Khawaja and Armstrong shortened Australian version of the Frost Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale) in a sample of 264 Australian first‐year Psychology students at University of Sydney. Regression analyses showed that dysfunctional perfectionism was predicted by extreme family enmeshment and by parenting styles that were highly authoritarian and high on psychological control. Functional perfectionism was also predicted by extreme family enmeshment and authoritarian parenting style, but not by high parental psychological control. An implication of these findings for counselling and remedial education programs for students working with dysfunctional perfectionist tendencies is that such programs need to include consideration of the possible influence of unhelpful controlling family processes that appear to be associated with the development of dysfunctional perfectionism. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Australian Journal of Psychology Wiley

Family of origin characteristics as predictors of perfectionism

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
2009 Australian Psychological Society
ISSN
0004-9530
eISSN
1742-9536
D.O.I.
10.1080/00049530802239326
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This study investigated perceptions of family of origin (parental style and family system characteristics) as predictors of dysfunctional and functional perfectionism (as measured by the Khawaja and Armstrong shortened Australian version of the Frost Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale) in a sample of 264 Australian first‐year Psychology students at University of Sydney. Regression analyses showed that dysfunctional perfectionism was predicted by extreme family enmeshment and by parenting styles that were highly authoritarian and high on psychological control. Functional perfectionism was also predicted by extreme family enmeshment and authoritarian parenting style, but not by high parental psychological control. An implication of these findings for counselling and remedial education programs for students working with dysfunctional perfectionist tendencies is that such programs need to include consideration of the possible influence of unhelpful controlling family processes that appear to be associated with the development of dysfunctional perfectionism.

Journal

Australian Journal of PsychologyWiley

Published: Sep 1, 2009

References

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