Family of Ebf/Olf‐1 ‐related genes potentially involved in neuronal differentiation and regional specification in the central nervous system

Family of Ebf/Olf‐1 ‐related genes potentially involved in neuronal differentiation and... Two novel mouse genes, Ebf2 and Ebf3, have been identified which show high similarity to the rodent Ebf/Olf‐1 and the Drosophila collier genes. The strong conservation of the protein regions corresponding to the DNA binding and dimerisation domains previously defined in Ebf strongly suggests that Ebf2 and Ebf3 also constitute DNA sequence‐specific transcription factors. Determination of the chromosomal locations of the two genes indicated that the different members of this novel mouse multigene family are not clustered. A detailed analysis of the expression of each of the three Ebf genes in the developing central nervous system revealed partially overlapping patterns with two salient features: 1) In the region extending from the midbrain to the spinal cord, the expression of the three genes correlated with neuronal maturation, with a general activation in early post‐mitotic cells, followed by specific patterns of extinction also consistent with the neurogenic gradient. 2) In the forebrain area, although the patterns of expression of the Ebf genes also reflected neuronal maturation, they appeared in addition to be region specific. These data suggest that Ebf genes may be involved in the control of neuronal differentiation in the CNS and in enforcing regional diversity in populations of post‐mitotic forebrain neurons. Dev. Dyn. 1997;210:191–205. © 1997 Wiley‐Liss, Inc. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Developmental Dynamics Wiley

Family of Ebf/Olf‐1 ‐related genes potentially involved in neuronal differentiation and regional specification in the central nervous system

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1997 Wiley‐Liss, Inc.
ISSN
1058-8388
eISSN
1097-0177
DOI
10.1002/(SICI)1097-0177(199711)210:3<191::AID-AJA1>3.0.CO;2-B
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Two novel mouse genes, Ebf2 and Ebf3, have been identified which show high similarity to the rodent Ebf/Olf‐1 and the Drosophila collier genes. The strong conservation of the protein regions corresponding to the DNA binding and dimerisation domains previously defined in Ebf strongly suggests that Ebf2 and Ebf3 also constitute DNA sequence‐specific transcription factors. Determination of the chromosomal locations of the two genes indicated that the different members of this novel mouse multigene family are not clustered. A detailed analysis of the expression of each of the three Ebf genes in the developing central nervous system revealed partially overlapping patterns with two salient features: 1) In the region extending from the midbrain to the spinal cord, the expression of the three genes correlated with neuronal maturation, with a general activation in early post‐mitotic cells, followed by specific patterns of extinction also consistent with the neurogenic gradient. 2) In the forebrain area, although the patterns of expression of the Ebf genes also reflected neuronal maturation, they appeared in addition to be region specific. These data suggest that Ebf genes may be involved in the control of neuronal differentiation in the CNS and in enforcing regional diversity in populations of post‐mitotic forebrain neurons. Dev. Dyn. 1997;210:191–205. © 1997 Wiley‐Liss, Inc.

Journal

Developmental DynamicsWiley

Published: Nov 1, 1997

References

  • Time of origins of neurons of the rat inferior colliculus and the relations between cytogenesis and tonotopic order in the auditory pathway
    Altman, Altman; Bayer, Bayer
  • Time of origins of neurons of the rat superior colliculus in relation to other components of the visual and visuomotor pathways
    Altman, Altman; Bayer, Bayer
  • Several receptor tyrosine kinase genes of the Eph family are segmentally expressed in the developing hindbrain
    Becker, Becker; Seitanidou, Seitanidou; Murphy, Murphy; Matté, Matté; Topilko, Topilko; Nieto, Nieto; Wilkinson, Wilkinson; Charnay, Charnay; Gilardi‐Hebenstreit, Gilardi‐Hebenstreit
  • collier , a novel regulator of Drosophila head development, is expressed in a single mitotic domain
    Crozatier, Crozatier; Valle, Valle; Dubois, Dubois; Ibnsouda, Ibnsouda; Vincent, Vincent
  • Expression patterns of the murine LIM class homeobox gene lim1 in the developing brain and excretory system
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